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News Briefs featuring Debbie Drechsler

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Core female cartoonists as named by Booklist

Updated March 27, 2008


My New York Diary. By Julie Doucet. 2d ed. 2004. Drawn & Quarterly, paper, $15.95 (9781896597836).

With brutal honesty, Doucet, creator of the underground comic Dirty Plotte, looks back on her harrowing bohemian days in Manhattan. Her loopy, cluttered drawings and postfeminist insouciance lend her account improbable charm.

One Hundred Demons. By Lynda Barry. 2002. Sasquatch, $24.95 (9781570613371); paper, $17.95 (9781570614590).

This collection of long stories by the creator of the weekly Ernie Pook’s Comeek is based on an art exercise that Barry uses to exorcise personal demons, among them, old boyfriends, grandmas, liars, hippies, the 2000 election, and her own bad behavior.

Summer of Love. By Debbie Drechsler. 2002. Drawn & Quarterly, $24.95 (1-896597-37-8); paper, $16.95 (1-896597-65-3).

Ninth-grader Lily has moved with her family to a new community and must find her place in her new high school’s pecking order. Drechsler compellingly captures the angst, insecurities, and petty feuds typical of the teen years as Lily tries to make friends and sexually awakens.

We Are on Our Own. By Miriam Katin. 2006. Drawn & Quarterly, $19.95 (9781896597201).

The first graphic novel by 63-year-old animator Katin recounts how she and her mother faked their deaths and fled Budapest after the Nazis occupied it. Passages set decades later reveal that Katin’s experiences deprived her of any religious faith to pass on to her child.

 
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Featured artists

Debbie Drechsler
Miriam Katin
Lynda Barry

           Featured products

My New York Diary
We Are On Our Own
What It Is




  San Antonio Current Praises D+Q Graphic Novels

Updated October 16, 2003



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Featured artists

Debbie Drechsler
Seth
Chris Ware

           Featured products

ACME Novelty Datebook Volume 1: 1986-1995
Vernacular Drawings




Acme Datebook, Summer of Love, etc, reviewed in Hartford Advocate

Updated August 25, 2003


The Advocate, Hartford's leading weekly newspaper, reviews a bunch of D+Q books past and present in this week's edition:
 
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Featured artists

David Collier
Debbie Drechsler
Chris Ware

           Featured products

Hamilton Sketchbook
ACME Novelty Datebook Volume 1: 1986-1995




  Debbie Drechsler's Summer of Love now available in paperback

Updated July 14, 2003


One of the best-reviewed graphic novels of recent years is finally available in paperback form. For this new edition, Drechsler reverted back to the original two-color scheme of the comic (this story was originally serialized in five issues of "Nowhere"). Click below for more.

Featured artist

Debbie Drechsler

          



2003 Harvey Award Nominees Announced!

Updated April 23, 2003


Among the very fine 2003 Harvey Award Nominees are the following D&Q artists and their books.

Congratulations to Chester and Debbie!

Best Cartoonist:
Chester Brown

Best Continuing Series:
Louis Riel

Best Graphic Album:
Summer of Love
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Featured artists

Chester Brown
Debbie Drechsler

          



A Shy Librarian is sold on GNs & Drechsler

Updated April 15, 2003


Excerpted from The Shy Librarian, Spring 2003, Vol. 3, No. 1

This was the first graphic novel I have read and I can now say, I am sold! The Summer of Love by Debbie Drechsler was striking, superb, subtle, and stupendous.

"Summer" is striking in its accurate portrayl of Lily's feelings as a young teenage girl. She struggles with insecurity about her changing body and feelings. The reader feels her longing to fit in at a new school, to make new friends, and have love in her life. There doesn't seem to be much love at home. Her emotional distance from her sisters and parents can be felt as the pages project her life to the reader.

Superb is the building of the story from the first page to the last. The book covers a summer and in part four and five, it takes us into the school year. The events that happen to Lily could be events that happen to any teenage girl. from discovering a secret her sister has, making out, to facing the lies and rumours told about about her by a boy; the reader could feel that Ms. Drechsler is talking about them.

The soft green and brown illustrations are subtle and stylish. They give the impression of being faded photos from an album and they lend a realistic feel to the setting, which is suburbia in the 1970s.
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Featured artist

Debbie Drechsler

          



Time.comix Top 10 of 2002: Debbie Drechsler

Updated March 17, 2003


Time.comix, December 2002
Printed in the woodsy tones of green and brown, Drechsler's Summer of Love tells the quiet story of a suburban girl growing up in the 1960s who tries to navigate a new school and new relationships. This is young adult fiction the way it ought to be — full of anxiety, passion, anger and love — but not at all for just young adults.

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Featured artist

Debbie Drechsler

          



Interview: Debbie Drechsler charts the trials of adolescence

Updated March 17, 2003


North Bay Bohemian, Jan 2-8 2003
Debbie Drechsler's 'Summer of Love' charts the trials of adolescence
By Richard von Busack

A term I hadn't thought of in 30 years popped into my head the morning after reading Santa Rosa artist Debbie Drechsler's graphic novel The Summer of Love. That word was "defriend."

In the unique vernacular of junior high school kids, "defriend" didn't just mean the opposite of "befriend." A friendship ought to suffer some stresses and survive, though it can be severed by one terrible incident. The sense of what it means to be defriended, as I knew it, was something more quick and yet more subtle. Defriending happened suddenly and for no serious reason--at least for no reason the defriended could understand. Thus, the threat was always there. Use it in a sentence: "You're not going to defriend me, are you?"
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Featured artist

Debbie Drechsler

          




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