home home about drawn and quarterly news artists shop shopping cart
Drawn and Quarterly Your Shopping Cart
Home About Artists Shop Events Press New Blog 211 Bernard Store Blog


News Briefs featuring Clare Briggs

( back )


OH SKIN-NAY in The Globe and Mail

Updated December 10, 2007


OH SKIN-NAY!
The Days of Real Sport
Clare Briggs, verses by Wilbur D. Nesbit
GLOBE AND MAIL
December 8, 2007

U.S. cartoonist Clare Briggs captured everyday moments in funny, sentimental and nimbly drawn panels in the early 1900s, under such series headings as When a Feller Needs a Friend. This is a lovely facsimile of a 1913 compilation of his "In the Days of Real Sport" cartoons, concerned not with sport as such, but rather with the interactions of kids ("Oh Skin-nay! Yoo-hoo! C'mon over") in the streets and the playgrounds. Jeet Heer provides an informative afterword.

 
click here to read more


Featured artist

Clare Briggs

           Featured product

Oh Skin-nay!




  OH SKIN-NAY reviewed by Panels and Pixels

Updated October 18, 2007


“Oh Skin-nay: The Days of Real Sport”
by Clare Briggs and Wilbur Nesbit, Drawn and Quarterly, 136 pages, $24.95.
PANELSANDPIXELS.BLOGSPOT.COM

The type of childhood Briggs depicts so nostalgically here, where kids play marbles in the street, hop rides on ice wagons and thaw out the water pump, was already fading into yesteryear when this book was originally published in 1913.

As such, there’s a wistful gloss that can be hard for contemporary readers to swallow.

Were there no outcasts, nerds or sullen loners that got routinely bullied in Briggs’ hometown?

Nesbit’s doggerel poetry accompanying the cartoons is cute but largely unnecessary — Briggs’ artistry is strong enough to convey the moment in question without any added text.

Despite my misgivings about this book, it’s not hard to see why Briggs was so beloved in his day, and I’d like to see more of his work put back into print.
click here to read more


Featured artist

Clare Briggs

           Featured product

Oh Skin-nay!




OH SKIN-NAY in The Hartford Advocate

Updated July 3, 2007


Oh Skin-Nay
Alan Bisbort
THE HARTFORD ADVOCATE

I am enamored of Drawn & Quarterly, a Montreal-based publisher of comic art, but I have no idea how they stay afloat. To say they do it for the love of comic art is warm and fuzzy-sounding, but love has never paid the printer’s costs.

The latest case in point is Oh Skin-nay: The Days of Real Sport, a facsimile reprint edition of a 1913 collaboration between artist Clare Briggs and poet Wilbur D. Nesbit. Ever heard of either? Didn’t think so. Neither had I until I got this book, which comes with Jeet Heer’s superb biographical essay on Briggs, in his day a popular and influential Chicago Tribune cartoonist.

The volume, portraying a year in the life of a small American town, is lavishly designed and handsomely packaged in hardbound casing. But the work itself is as anachronistic as the knickerbockers the lad on the cover is wearing. Quaint stories of ice skating, fishing, Santa Claus, and school playground antics that are as gosh-darn innocent as a cowlick. Almost better than the actual contents is the fact that a publisher would preserve this lost piece of our past, preserving this world, which probably didn’t exist to begin with…not unlike Norman Rockwell’s faux American innocence. Not to put too crass a spin on it, but there’s not a whole lot of demand for this material (though it would be a better world if there was). I’m reminded of the Robyn Hitchcock line about “There’s no money and poetry / And vice versa.”

Drawn & Quarterly http://www.drawnandquarterly.com/ does this sort of material ALL THE TIME. They are, for example, reprinting all of Frank King’s Walt & Skeezix and Gasoline Alley comic strips in sturdy and beautiful hardbound volumes. King’s world was not unlike Briggs’. They both grew up in smalltown America, before sprawl or corporate rape.

Go to Drawn & Quarterly’s Web site, http://www.drawnandquarterly.com/ . You will be amazed at what you find there. Support them. Keep them alive. And, soon, perhaps we will return to a time when the sickening stain of Bush and Cheney will be eradicated, the terrorists will go fuck themselves, and the rest of us can live happily ever after. Like Oh Skin-nay and Gasoline Alley, thanks to Drawn & Quarterly.
 

Featured artist

Clare Briggs

           Featured product

Oh Skin-nay!




  OH SKIN-NAY in The Post Standard/Herald-Journal

Updated May 22, 2007


COMICS
"OH SKIN-NAY!' TACKLES ISSUES OF 1880S IN ARCHIVAL REPRINT
JEFF KAPALKA
13 May 2007
The Post Standard/Herald-Journal


American comics, as an art form, have been around now for more than a century. I've been around for a bit less, but still, I've seen my share of comics history. Some of it was as it happened, and a lot of it was through reprint volumes.

"Pogo," "Peanuts," "Krazy Kat," "B.C.," "Dick Tracy" - the shelves of Comics Central are lined with the usual suspects. But even more exciting, publishers today are excavating more rarified relics from comics' distant past.

"Oh Skin-nay! The Days of Real Sport Drawn and Quarterly"; $24.95.

Take for example, Drawn and Quarterly's latest tome: "Oh Skin-nay! The Day's of Real Sport" by Clare Briggs with verses by Wilbur D. Nesbitt. Not exactly on my short list for archiving, but it turns out to be a charming look at a past that was quaint, even in the year of its original publication (1911, in case you're interested). The strip, a look at 1880s America, as seen by an average 12-year-old kid (the usually off-panel Skin-nay), tackled such contemporary controversies as playing post office, the last day of school, Sunday picnics and the like.

The book in question is a facsimile edition of a 1913 collection of the strips, accompanied by short verses elaborating on the day's theme. It's a fun, low-key and nostalgic trip through a period long gone. Today's reader might look askance at a few of the strips, politically incorrect (a la Mark Twain) as they are, but they still reflect an innocence that seems to be absent from contemporary life.

The book is rounded out by an afterward by comics historian Jeet Heer profiling Briggs' career.

Featured artist

Clare Briggs

           Featured product

Oh Skin-nay!





copyright ©2010 drawn & quarterly