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Julie Morstad is "What We're Loving" at the Paris Review

Updated April 3, 2013


From "What We’re Loving: Carson, Hatterr, Fidel"

Nicole Rudick
The Paris Review, 8 Febrary 2013

If you’re going to judge a book by its endpapers, then I recommend Julie Morstad’s The Wayside. I’ve spent a fair amount of time imagining them on the walls of the drawing room I don’t have. It helps that the rest of the book—all new drawings by the Canadian illustrator—is equal parts charming and strange. There’s definitely an Edward Gorey–esque feel to her work, but I also see occasional hints of William Pène du Bois (in a troupe of women acrobats) and Amy Cutler (in the wonderful patterned textiles). I think my favorite drawing may be a double gatefold depicting groups of flatly rendered performing-arts kids doing their thing. It’s Attic form meets Fame.
 

Featured artist

Julie Morstad

           Featured product

The Wayside




  Paste Magazine says The Wayside "originates in the deep earnestness of childhood"

Updated January 16, 2013


The Wayside by Julie Morstad
Published at 3:24 PM on December 20, 2012 BY HILLARY BROWN

Writer/Artist: Julie Morstad
Publisher: Drawn + Quarterly
2012

Somewhere between Emily Winfield Martin’s sweet vintage illustrations for The Black Apple and Hideo Nakata’s visions of avenging nature spirits lies Julie Morstad’s work, which has the genuine creepiness of non-bowdlerized fairytales. The Wayside is more a collection of drawings than a comic proper, but it does have moments of sequential storytelling, mostly in its first few pages. Whether there’s an overarching narrative hidden throughout the book is indeterminate, especially without words to help, but it seems likely that any links among the individual vignettes are more thematic than plot-based.

Morstad’s characters, mostly female, are constructed of thin, simple lines, overlaid with washes and occasional collage elements. Although the hatching evokes the work of Edward Gorey, Morstad’s tongue is in her mouth where it belongs, not her cheek. It’s not that The Wayside is humorless. Instead, it originates in the deep earnestness of childhood, which is what makes this hardcover fit so well alongside her illustrations in children’s books like The Swing and Singing Away the Dark. There is play here, but it’s serious stuff. The gymnasts who create a pyramid in one drawing aren’t dour, but focused; their simplified faces intent on the task at hand while their limbs go every which way.

Calling to mind Chris Van Allsburg’s The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, many of the images evoke stories: a woman sits at a table with her back to her family, knitting, as her Rapunzel-esque hair cascades into a child’s arms; one man in a suit trims the large, gorgeous butterfly wings of a compatriot, the panels of color fallen to the floor like fingernail pairings; a girl, fearful and curious, lifts the white sheet off a seated figure to peak underneath. The Wayside is a tough book to pin down, existing in the realm of the half-awake, but drives hope that Morstad will do a longer story soon.
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Featured artist

Julie Morstad

           Featured product

The Wayside




The Snipe acclaims Julie Morstad's The Wayside

Updated January 15, 2013


Book launch—Julie Morstad, The Wayside at Lucky’s, Nov 3
- by Brendan Fairweather

On Saturday Nov 3, Lucky’s Comics (3972 Main Street) in Vancouver will host an evening release party for Julie Morstad’s most recent book, The Wayside.

The hardcover, published by Drawn + Quarterly, features all new illustrations from the Vancouver-based artist. The launch marks Morstad’s second release with D + Q after 2011’s Milk Teeth. Milk Teeth was the first in the Montreal publisher’s petit-livre series to go back to print after quickly selling out.

The new book is a collection of pen and ink drawings as well as collage-like mixed media pieces. A short write-up on the Drawn + Quarterly website describes the book:

Within these pages, Morstad’s worlds unite, maintaining their ethereal, almost fairy-tale beauty while also achieving a loose overarching synthesis through thematic and visual commonalities. The work found herein combines the delicate line of Edward Gorey with the color palette of Marcel Dzama, and emerges as something utterly unique: a combination of the two with the spirit of Virginia Woolf. Similar to her first D+Q book, Milk Teeth, Morstad’s drawings—dramatic, poetic, and heavy with symbolism—speak for themselves, exploring femininity, identity, and personal mythologies.

Morstad is an artist, illustrator and animator who works mostly on children’s books and drawings. Her work has a playful and childlike tone with a hint of surrealism. The fine-line drawings and mixed-media collages give her work great diversity.

She has also done some animation, including a collaboration with her brother Paul Morstad on the music video for the Neko Case song “People Got a Lotta Nerve”.
 
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Featured artist

Julie Morstad

           Featured product

The Wayside




  Julie Morstad interview in Vancouver Mom

Updated January 10, 2012


November 23, 2011
Heather Maxwell Hall

Julie Morstad is an award-winning illustrator and fine artist known for her surreal, whimsical work. She’s one of my favourite local artists and the children’s books she’s illustrated are among my son’s favourites, including When You Were Small and Where You Came From. Julie’s work is shown in galleries and she’s animated music videos with her brother (like this amazing one they did for Neko Case). She lives in East Vancouver with her family.

I asked her a few questions about what it’s like to be an artist and mother of three.

How would you describe what you do?

I draw. I illustrate and write children’s books, do editorial illustration and show in galleries. I also sell prints of my drawings through my site. I can sometimes be found at Emily Carr teaching a class in the Illustration Program.

How many kids do you have and how do you manage the balance between being an artist and a mom?

I have three kids: Jake is 15, Henry is five and Ida is three.

I have a rad husband who is super supportive in general and makes it possible for me to get stuff done. He is also an artist and teaches high school art.

My brother (another artist) and I trade childcare hours with our daughters while my sons are in school. It’s complicated, busy and chaotic most days around here but in a good, functional and (mostly) fun way! I work from a studio in my house so that means I can fit things in here and there. I do usually feel like I’m behind in everything, though.

What’s been inspiring you lately?

I have always been inspired by the illustrations in children’s books. Some of my favorites are Mary Blair, Gyo Fujikawa, Alice and Martin Provensen, Barbara Cooney, Tove Jannson, Bruno Munari, and of course, Maurice Sendak. My daughter is named after his character, Ida, in Outside Over There.

Also, right now I’m really into textiles from the Bauhaus, mid-20th century Eastern European graphic art and animation, and folk art. I’m inspired by the very remote chance that I might someday have time to design textiles and weave tapestries. I need a clone.

Do you find that having a family has changed your work as an artist (or its focus) in any way?

I have actually had a child for pretty much my whole adult life as I had my first child at 20, so that’s a tough question. There has definitely never been much time to slack. It makes one pretty determined to make a go of things. I suppose my younger kids renewed my interests in the possibilities of children’s books.

What are some of your favourite kid-friendly things to do in Vancouver?

Collage Collage, bike rides to Third Beach and Spanish Banks, Trout Lake.

What’s next for you?

I have a book coming out this month called When I was Small. It’s the third book in a series by author Sara O’Leary. I will also have three more books coming out in the next year.

To discover more of Vancouver artist Julie Morstad’s incredible work, and maybe pick up a few prints, check out her website at www.juliemorstad.com.
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Featured artist

Julie Morstad

          



RED COLORED ELEGY, MILK TEETH and AYA OF YOP CITY reviewed by LA CityBeat

Updated November 28, 2008


Comicopia
By Gabrielle Paluch
November 5, 2008
LOS ANGELES CITYBEAT

In many ways, this year marks the tragic end of an era in political cartoons. In case you needed another reason to believe life was ironic and cruel: The iconic New York Review caricaturist David Levine is suffering from macular degeneration, and may be slowly going blind. On the upside, Fantagraphics Books is putting out a collection of his drawings of American political figures which truly highlight the incredible sensibility and wit that will be missing from the comics world. For those of you in need of guidance, wanting a comics/graphic novels fix and not knowing where to turn – enjoy our picks!

Red Colored Elegy
by Seiichi Hayashi (Drawn and Quarterly)
If you ever look up at the moon and think it’s crying, that means you’re either drunk or depressed and sexually frustrated. Or all of the above, perhaps, in Japan in 1971 – how romantic!

Red Colored Elegy is the tale of Japanese illustrator Ichiro, his relationships, fears, and bent head all rendered in minimalist fashion. Author Seiichi Hayashi uses sparse line work and animation techniques borrowed from film to express the troubled relationship between Ichiro and his girlfriend Sachiko stylistically, resulting in a moving and stunningly poetic work that inspired an album of the same title by Japanese folk singer Morio Agata.

The romance between Ichiro and Sachiko not only inspired a romantic ideal for a generation of Japanese readers, it also offered a representation of how centuries-old customs in traditional Japanese culture have influenced relationships in modern times, as though Ichiro and Sachiko were wrestling not just with each other in the images on the pages, but also with all the implicit expectations of their ancestors. As is typical of much Japanese film and literature, it’s unclear by the end what exactly has happened, who loves whom, and who is whose sibling, stuff like that. But that’s half the fun!

Hayashi’s influences include underground Japanese comics of the time (which broke with traditional manga subject matter) as well as French New Wave cinema – two forms which sound like they would have a really cool hipster baby. Drawn and Quarterly has been releasing lots of underground manga from the ’70s translated from the Japanese, like Yoshihiro Tatsumi’s Good-Bye. The manga from this period as well as the Nouvelle Vague which inspired it share a common disjointed form of storytelling, something that seems to be very of the moment in contemporary media. Now we can enjoy the confusion and frustration of generations past in all its sublime beauty without even having to learn Japanese. (GP)

Milk Teeth
by Julie Morstad (Drawn and Quarterly)
There are as many ways to tell a story as there are stars in the sky. Julie Morstad tells stories in images from imagined places in this collection of her drawings, published in the petits livres format by Drawn and Quarterly. The amount of work that went into this tiny little book is astounding. While there is no linear narrative to speak of, each drawing tells the story of an idea – the story of the girl with bees flying out of her ear, or the man with the fishbowl beard. It seems only appropriate to respond to Ms. Morstad’s charming, brilliantly idiosyncratic creations in kind. (GP)

Aya of Yop City
by Abouet and Oubrerie
(Drawn and Quarterly)
Let me break it down for you. Most characters in this book are connected, like the skirt chaser Mamadou, who is the real father of Adjou’s baby, but everybody thinks that the rich boy, Moussa, is the father, because Adjou’s parents want to believe the lie, only to get the money that comes from a rich family. And that’s only one part of the story in the second book from writer Marguerite Abouet and artist Clement Oubrerie.

In Yoptong on the Ivory Coast in the 1970s, the hip wear bellbottoms and brightly colored pagnes (skirts). Though the African continent is so far away from us, character’s problems are similar to ours – or at least to an episode of Jerry Springer. Abouet’s story is a soap where old world traditions clash with Afros and reckless young adults just want to drive their Toyotas.

We are treated to the citizens of Yop and their lives – the promiscuous young adult community often meets in the public park after nightfall and most of the children of the city are conceived on park benches. The tone of the book is so hopeful, because it’s told through Aya’s reactions – so when Hyacinte is caught dancing with a girl the same age as his own daughter, people get mad, but the situation becomes a cartoon cloud of fists and shoes.

Oubrerie’s art makes for a colorful Africa, where characters mime their feelings in exaggerated motions – like Moussa, who wants to be a playboy, but his character looks like a snake slithering up to women. Colors go from neon bright on clothes to faded and washed out in the heat. Panels that take place outdoors show the heat shimmering from the ground, making faces and shapes seem distorted and desperate.

Starting the series on the second book makes for a good read – it stands alone as its own separate story – but after the cliffhanger ending, you’ll want to go back and read the first and devour the third book, whenever it comes out. (Nathan Solis)
 
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Featured artists

Abouet & Oubrerie
Seiichi Hayashi
Julie Morstad

           Featured products

Milk Teeth
Red Colored Elegy
Aya of Yop City




  MILK TEETH reviewed by Party Sunny

Updated November 28, 2008


Milk Teeth
November 5, 2008
PARTLY SUNNY

My boyfriend recently bought me a book called “Milk Teeth” by Vancouver artist Julie Morstad.

I was immediately drawn to the simplicity of the white stock and the natural palette of the colors used on the cover. As I flipped through, I was transported into a warped like world like an Alice in Wonderland of sorts.

The book contains delicate line drawings and etchings of a girl getting lost in her fairytale like surroundings, mixed with a dreamlike state with a touch of distorted like images resembling nightmares.

You’d have to take a look for yourself and let me know what you think because I thought it was quite refreshing.
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Featured artist

Julie Morstad

           Featured product

Milk Teeth




Chris Von Szombathy and Julie Morstad at the Vancouver Art Gallery

Updated August 6, 2008


Chris Von Szombathy, Julie Morstad and others
August 24th
11 am to 5pm

COMIX & STORIES
A day of alternative & small press comics zines, artwork & culture
Vancouver Art Gallery
750 Hornby St, Vancouver, BC
 
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Featured artists

Julie Morstad
Chris von Szombathy

           Featured products

Milk Teeth
Fire Away




  PETITS LIVRES series spotlighted by The Edmonton Journal

Updated April 15, 2008


Small is beautiful
Tiny books with big ideas punch well above their weight
Gilbert A. Bouchard, edmontonjournal.com
Published: Saturday, April 12
EDMONTON JOURNAL

The pile of brand-new releases from Montreal-based graphic-novel publishers Drawn and Quarterly is remarkably compact.
Stacked one on top of the other, the four titles from the recently inaugurated "Petits Livres" (French for small books) imprint -- a line of books promising "small-and-affordable" art books with a contemporary graphic/comic-art vibe -- are only three centimetres thick.
The smallest book in the lot -- Tom Horacek's All We Ever Do is Talk About Wood -- is a beautifully precious tome that's 12.5 centimetres square, and only half a centimetre thick.

Yet, while the books are small potatoes size-wise, they pack a huge wallop artistically, more than living up to their promise of being the new wave of art books for the post-graphic-novel era.
Gone are the days when fans of graphic/comic-book art would put up with badly printed comic books on bad pulp paper. Modern graphic-novel fans expect, nay demand, top-quality sequential-art books.
Hence the birth of imprints like Petits Livres. Boasting work by cutting-edge underground print artists/cartoonists like Chris Von Szombathy and Julie Morstad, the books are delightfully playful, chock-a-block with spectacularly realized drawings and graphics, as well as being beautiful in their physical production, paper quality and reproductive clarity.
More than just feeding into a newish hunger for high-end comic books, the imprint is also feeding into a centuries-old love of small tomes that you can comfortably hold in the palm of your hands (or even the palm of one hand).
A surprisingly large number of tiny tomes are being released both by graphic-novel and mini-comic-book publishers as well as mainstream publishing houses.
This trend feeds into a western love of small books that goes back to the Middle Ages, a period that saw huge illustrated manuscripts with wooded, jewel-encrusted covers that permanently sat on their own lecterns, as well as smaller-than-small prayer books, breviaries, books of hours, and poetry texts.
Obviously, these small books -- especially the tiny sacred books -- had a practical side (i.e., a prayer book that's portable allows owners to pray wherever they may find themselves), but they also played other esthetic, cultural and even fetish-object functions.
According to Joan Greer, an art historian with the University of Alberta, little books (small, highly personal, highly tactile tomes) throughout history have allowed individuals to explore the contradictory public/private nature of the book.
"Book designers in the 19th century called books 'pocket cathedrals,' acknowledging the reality that a book was a small public space were community happened, the exchange of ideas and beliefs that was both private and public at the same time," she says.
"Your book connects you to a larger world, but does so in your own space. This makes the book both artistically beautiful as well as community-building."
Greer says the tiny book also represents the height of the tactile relationship many book owners have with their volumes.
"When most people think of a 'book,' they are thinking about the content of the book, but what we also need to think about when we're thinking of the idea of the book is its physicality, its materiality," she explains. "That includes the feel of the book, the esthetic pleasure you get from the book as well as the knowledge contained in the volume. The look of the book is as much a 'sign' as the books themselves, and the design of the book is active and really pushes things."
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Featured artists

Nicolas Robel
Julie Morstad
Tom Horacek

           Featured products

Joseph
Milk Teeth
All We Ever Do Is Talk About Wood




ADRIAN TOMINE EVENT mentioned by the Hour

Updated February 22, 2008


February 21st, 2008
Adrian Tomine inspires comics overview
Shortcomings and long views
Isa Tousignant
THE HOUR


Comic star Adrian Tomine comes to town to talk, and inspires an overview of recent local comic production

Guess who's coming to town? It's our favourite self-hating hipster! Or at least that's what critics would have us believe. As soon as I got comic artist Adrian Tomine on the phone from Brooklyn, I had to ask the author of the recently released, incredibly popular and critically acclaimed graphic novel Shortcomings about this line in the press release for his upcoming talk at the Drawn & Quarterly Bookstore: "He'll be presenting a slide show that confronts his critics who accused him of 'hiding' his racial identity behind his glasses." Huh?
"Ha ha! It's because for a long time when I used to draw autobiographical stories and I used to draw myself as a character, I'd draw myself with glasses that were just sort of opaque, empty and white", he says. "There was a lot of silly conjecture that I was maybe trying to disguise my own features. So in the slide show I go through a history of that in cartooning, going all the way back to Robert Crumb and even Charles Schultz - when he drew this character Marcie she just had these opaque little round glasses. That's just a starting point."

Tomine - who's Japanese American, by the way - has made work intertwined with autobiography since the start of his equally famous Optic Nerve series. With Shortcomings, though, his first long-format work, he tried to move away from the genre - a bit.

"It's probably the least directly autobiographical thing that I've done, though it's such a slippery term. It doesn't directly transcribe events or

characters or dialogue from my real life in the way that other stories I've done have. But it's hard for me to think of any sort of fiction that isn't somehow personal, or somehow autobiographical. Though Shortcomings may seem like the most autobiographical, to people who know a bit about me. But that's a sleight of hand."

What else can we expect from the event? General info about how Shortcomings came about, as well as more technical details about Tomine's working process, the process of laying out the pages and designing the book, as well as a Q&A period and a signing. Don't miss it.

DRAWING DEEPER

Speaking of recent comic production, you should check these out too, most (if not all) of which are purchasable at D+Q:

Fire Away, by Chris von Szombathy

The latest in D+Q's delightful Petits Livres series, this page-popping colour minibook reveals a Vancouver artist whose goofy, pop aesthetic is a pleasure to discover, here for the first time in print. Though transporting in a creatively populated, anthropomorphic, Bell-ish way, I was left searching for content that was more than simply aesthetic.

Milk Teeth, by Julie Morstad

Another Vancouverite's Petit Livre, this delicate book by Morstad is like a lesson in fine etching. The sophistication and refinement of her style are undoubtedly what have made her a popular commercial illustrator around the country. As a book, it's a little jewel that would make the perfect gift to someone with heightened sensibilities.

Paul Goes Fishing, by Michel Rabagliati

This latest translation by D+Q of one of Quebec's top-selling artists is a guaranteed good read, in classic Rabagliati fashion - there's a signature Frenchness and a calming familiarity about all of Paul's Montreal-based adventures that make them a distinct pleasure to consume. They don't reinvent the wheel, but who needs to drive anywhere when life's about fishing?

Albert and the Others, by Guy Delisle

Delisle has created politically charged work in the past, which may be what gives this, and its predecessor Aline and the Others, its incomparable bite. These 30-panel, wordless comics about the trials and tribulations of being a man (Aline was about women) are sharper and funnier than you'd imagine possible.
 
click here to read more


Featured artists

Adrian Tomine
Julie Morstad
Chris von Szombathy

           Featured products

Shortcomings (HC)
Milk Teeth
Fire Away




  MILK TEETH reviewed by Jeet Heer

Updated January 17, 2008


Julie Morstad’s Subdued Creepiness
January 11, 2008 by Jeet Heer

If you were forced to describe Julie Morstad’s drawings in a few quick words “subdued, languid creepiness” might do the trick. Subdued and languid: no matter how macabre the situation her characters find themselves in they never scream, their almond-shaped eyes vacantly stare out at their bizarre predicaments, and an air of genteel languor, as at an Edwardian tea party, hangs over every scene. Creepiness: insect and snakes crawl everywhere, limbs have a way of mutating into odd shapes (often looking like the furry squirrel tails), heads are frequently detached from bodies.


The line between animals and humans is constantly blurred. One drawing shows a young girl in bed, sitting up with her legs covered by a quilt. Her arms and legs are all fur, which is the obvious animal part of her. But there is a subtler form of animalization in the drawing: her dress looks like a leopard’s spotted skin. In another drawing a similar girl nonchalantly lets a hoard of bees enter into her right ear and exit from the left one. Her turtleneck sweater gives her head the layered stripes of a beehive: she’s a queen bee or a honey pot.

If we spend enough time on these drawings, we can tease out the histories of her characters. A young man, crew cut and nattily dressed, has a crowd of girls (Barbie doll sized but very much alive) stand on his head. Some of the girls are falling off since his head doesn’t have room for all of them. One could surmise that he’s a lady’s man who doesn’t have enough brain cells to remember all the skirts he chases.

Of all the modes of modern art, surrealism is the one least susceptible to sloppiness or imprecision. If you are going to create a dream like environment, you have to be a damn good draughtsman, able to fool the eye into believing impossible things. It’s generally the case that the best surrealists have been the artists with strong basic drawing skills: Pavel Tchelitchew, Max Ernst, Winsor McCay. Morstad belongs to this tradition.

Edward Gorey is her artistic uncle; but her drawings are darker and more foreboding than his. Gorey influence can be seen especially in the way Mostad draws hair and fur, brushy lines that a little bit thicker and denser than verisimilitude requires. Hair is a big part of Morstad’s aesthetic: it’s constantly getting entangled or growing wildly like a jungle.

Julie Morstad lives in Vancouver. Her drawings can be found on her website and in her new book Milk Teeth (available from her publisher Drawn and Quarterly; or you can find it at better bookstores everywhere).
click here to read more


Featured artist

Julie Morstad

           Featured product

Milk Teeth




MILK TEETH mentioned by Vancouver Sun

Updated January 10, 2008


Editor's choice: 8 recommended new books by B.C. authors
MILK TEETH
22 December 2007
VANCOUVER SUN

Julie Morstad illustrated Sara O'Leary's children's book, When You Were Small, which won the Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award. This is a small, wordless collection of her pictures, which are delicate, imaginative, whimsical and haunting.
 

Featured artist

Julie Morstad

           Featured product

Milk Teeth




  MILK TEETH reviewed by Hipster Book Club

Updated January 10, 2008


MILK TEETH
Libby K. Hartigan
HIPSTER BOOK CLUB
January, 2008

Milk Teeth by Julie Morstad is not a traditional story—the stories here are told through drawings. While some drawings speak to each other, most stand alone, evoking strange, other-worldly narratives where delicate children seem lost in their thoughts. They eat flowers, hide from tigers, fall blindfolded into nothingness and recline among stacks of teacups like characters left out of Alice in Wonderland.

There are no teeth in Milk Teeth, or smiles. There is a series of visual poems whose language references birds, heads, and hair. The hair is sleek. It covers faces, wraps around necks, turns into castles, plants, and rabbits. There is longing, somberness, and dismay. Everyone is trapped somewhere and must accept it. Hair wraps around and around a huge head, where two thin girls are bound, their hands and legs hanging limply, though one clutches a rabbit by the ears.

After looking at them for a while, many of the images appear to have macabre elements, which may be why Morstad's work is compared to that of illustrator Edward Gorey (best known for the melodramatic credit sequence of the BBC's Mystery! series). Clusters of men in suits sprout from flowers while from nearby blooms, ominous wolves peer. An elegant flapper gazes into the air with ennui while diaphanous curtains blow around her, and from one finger, blood drips and pools on the floor. A swarm of angry bees emerges from a girl's ear. A girl sits up in bed, seemingly surprised that her arms and legs have turned into long fluffy ermine-like tails which spill over and entwine on the floor.

The colors are beautiful, like hand-tinted sepia photos. The intricate detail suggests many hours spent in the sumptuous palace of Morstad's imagination, and the imagery feels irrationally right. This little book is a pleasure.
click here to read more


Featured artist

Julie Morstad

           Featured product

Milk Teeth




PETITS LIVRES series spotlighted by The Hour

Updated January 10, 2008


January 3rd, 2008
Hit List
Isa Tousignant
THE HOUR

Resolve to appreciate good things in small packages, like a smaller house, a smaller car, smaller meals and the latest in Drawn & Quarterly's Petits Livres series, three gorgeous little comics by, respectively, nouveau surrealist C. Von Szombathy, dreamy illustrator Julie Morstad and wordlessly witty comic stripper Guy Delisle. Swing by the D+Q store (211 Bernard W.) and see - you'll want them all.
 
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Featured artists

Guy Delisle
Julie Morstad
Chris von Szombathy

           Featured products

Milk Teeth
Fire Away




  MILK TEETH on Book By Its Cover

Updated December 21, 2007


12.20.07
MILK TEETH
Julie Morstad
BOOK BY ITS COVER

I was so excited when this little book came in the mail. As you know, I’m a big fan of Julie’s work as you can see here or here and I’m so glad Drawn and Quarterly is too. This new book of her work is perfect. It’s small and simple and set on white- a good match for her delicate fine line drawings and etchings. The book contains many of the images which you can see on her site here plus a few I hadn’t seen before. I love looking at these and getting lost in her fairy-tale like world where rabbits dance upon a small boy’s head or little girl’s grow long fox tail looking arms. I just learned from Drawn and Quarterly’s press release for this book that Julie has a line of wallpaper (who doesn’t these days?- they are just working out the kinks on mine.) which you can see here- beautiful! You can pick up a copy of this book here- for only 12.95(!) a last minute holiday gift anyone would enjoy!
ps. I think Tiny Showcase should set up an automatic payment button so those of us who have a Tuesday nightlife don’t miss beauties like this.
click here to read more


Featured artist

Julie Morstad

           Featured product

Milk Teeth




MILK TEETH launch mentioned by Inkstuds

Updated December 21, 2007


INKSTUDS

Milk Teeth Launch
In lew of a new show this week, here is an event to go check out next month.

On December 11th at 7pm, my favorite comeek store, Lucky’s(3972 Main st.) will be hosting a launch for a new book from D&Q. The launch will be for Milk Teeth by Julie Morstad. Her stuff is pretty awesome and I can’t imagine the book being anything less that excellence. Here is the write up from the D&Q website -

In this collection of illustrations, Vancouver artist Julie Morstad spins fairy tales infused with dreamlike innocence and a touch of the macabre. Morstad’s work has been shown in galleries, featured on the cover of Neko Case’s 2006 album Fox Confessor Brings the Flood and developed into a line of patterned wallpapers with a distinctive nostalgic quality. Milk Teeth’s universe, populated by animals, flowers, peculiar objects and disembodied heads, has a sensibility reminiscent of Marcel Dzama’s surreal drawings, Jeffrey Eugenides’ haunting novel The Virgin Suicides, and Peter Weir’s classic film Picnic at Hanging Rock.

You should come check it out. I will be there, why not you.
 
click here to read more


Featured artist

Julie Morstad

           Featured product

Milk Teeth





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