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News Briefs featuring Amy Lockhart

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Amy Lockheart's animation on The Daily Psychedelic Video

Updated April 4, 2013


"Amy Lockhart – Walk For Walk (2005)"

The Daily Psychedelic Video, 12 March 2013

Wonderful adventures of a diverse cast of peculiar characters.
 
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Featured artist

Amy Lockhart

          



  Marc Bell hitting the road for a European tour!

Updated March 23, 2010


4/2LambiekAmsterdam, NL
4/8BD SpiritParis, FR
4/10Escale Du LivreBordeaux, FR



Featured artists

Marc Bell
Amy Lockhart

          



The Ember reviews DIRTY DISHES

Updated March 23, 2010


Amy Lockhart’s ‘Dirty Dishes’

by Elizabeth Prater

Slim, easily browsed and just about small enough to fit into the back pocket of your jeans, Dirty Dishes offers a compressed look at some of the less exposed aspects of Amy Lockhart’s practice. Drawn and Quarterly is a broad church, it has gathered together many independent, thoughtful and intellectually aspiring graphic novelists and comic artists. Drawn and Quarterly’s Petits Livres are limited edition art books which stylishly but inexpensively package groundbreaking artwork by cartoonists and artists from around the globe.
Working in the painstaking, hands on medium of lo-tech paper animation, Lockhart has received attention and praise for short films such as Walk for Walk. While studying at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design she was also schooling herself in film making and animation. Lockhart attended Helen Hill’s experimental animation workshop at AFCOOP in Halifax and has also completed an artist’s residency at the Quickdraw Animation Society (Calgary) and a fellowship at the National Film Board in Montreal. Dirty Dishes is the first book collection of her work.

The selection of works included in Dirty Dishes was made by Lockhart herself in partnership with Marc Bell. It’s fair to guess then that these are works Lockhart wants to be known and judged by. Aside from two sample cells from Walk for Walk, and a couple of short panel narrative cartoons, the greater portion of Dirty Dishes is given over to Lockhart’s naïve canvases and to a handful of heavy-line etchings.

Lockhart is un-self-consciously subjective in her depiction of the human form and a hard-core anthropomorphist in her depiction of the material world. Her figurative images suggest basic narratives and cryptic symbolic relationships. They are surreal and hallucinatory in a familiar cartoon way. The human torso is a dominant motif - male or female, sheathed in cursory bands of implied underwear (a kind of back-woodsy, hillbilly devolution of super-hero spandex). The torsoes are rigid and sinewy. Often they are lacking in limbs. Lockhart explains that she really likes the torso shape, and that removing arms lets you focus on it. Perhaps this is also a legacy of Lockhart’s work in paper animation - mobile body parts such as arms and legs are always detachable. Lockhart’s etchings bear some resemblance to the deep scrawled lines of German expressionists like Dix and Grosz, and she has perhaps absorbed something of their crooked vision of mangled bodies in war-wracked Europe. Lockhart’s altered bodies are counter-culture kooks, though, they are not blighted victims.

Lockhart’s reiterative subject matter gives Dirty Dishes an insistent and obsessive feel. Much of the appeal of outsider art often comes from the way in which a singular vision can take on the semblance of a case-study. Lockhart probably wouldn’t shy away from that kind of resonance, but I doubt she would see herself as an outsider (outsiders install drywall or sell insurance, they don’t go to art school) and I doubt that outsider appeal is really what she’s working towards. In spite of the somewhat self-conscious oddity of the images, Lockhart’s work carries on a number of traditions, all of which are mainstream in their own way. Or rather (given that ‘mainstream’ is such a toxic word) Lockhart’s work shows a conscious slant towards populist forms. The makeshift technique of Lockhart’s bold acrylics resonates with the social purpose of street murals and the municipal art of Africa and South America. In Lockhart’s work there is a sense that sophisticated technique has been abandoned on the suspicion that it harbours insincerity.

In Dirty Dishes, Lockhart can be seen nurturing her idiosyncratic, subjective vision. This will carry her so far - but questioning, subverting, resisting and refiguring that vision will take her much further.
 
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Featured artist

Amy Lockhart

           Featured product

Dirty Dishes




  Hot Potatoe & Dirty Dishes: Marc Bell & Amy Lockart On The Road

Updated November 17, 2009


Y'know, take off fans, Amy Lockhart and Marc Bell are traveling as far as ever a puffin flew, eh. They hit the 401 this week and travel down to Trawna, and then to London, and back to Montreal.

Friday, November 20th | MAGIC PONY GALLEY | Toronto | 7 PM
http://www.magic-pony.com/

Wednesday, November 25th | FOREST CITY GALLERY | London | 9 PM | Blackshire Pub
forestcitygallery.ca

Friday, November 27th | LIBRAIRIE D+Q | Montreal | 7 PM

In 2010, they'll go as far as the CPR will take them perhaps to Sackville, Halifax and St Johns...that's right people NOOFUNLAN! That's how much they love Canada, they are traveling to the Maritimes in the winter!

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Featured artists

Marc Bell
Amy Lockhart

           Featured product

Dirty Dishes




Amy Lockhart review in Canadian Art magazine

Updated August 17, 2009


Amy Lockhart: Sculpture in a Feminist Frame
La Centrale, Montreal May 22 to Jun 21 2009
by Gabrielle Moser

It could seem cliché to come across a pack of matches, a container of gasoline and a garbage can of half-burned bras as one enters a feminist artist-run centre. But Amy Lockhart’s recent work at Montreal’s La Centrale manages to sidestep worn-out stereotypes with inventive, handmade appropriations of common objects—here, she transforms the familiar into the strange and surreal. The artist’s solo show, “Give Up the Ghost,” is a survey of outsider art–inspired sculptures, which together construct “an absurd parallel universe” out of very simple materials: paper, glue, masking tape and colourful acrylic paint.
At the centre of the exhibition is Lockhart’s Self-Portrait as a Lady, an exaggerated sculptural bust equipped with a disarmingly realistic protruding tongue and a pair of eyes that seem to follow the viewer around the room. Much like a three-dimensional cartoon character, Lockhart’s inanimate alter ego presides over the artist’s other creations and provides a thematic link for this group of seemingly unrelated ephemeral objects. A single red, high-heeled pump labelled “Red Shoes of Human Rights” occupies the plinth next to the artist’s self-portrait, for instance. On the walls, painted images of flattened and distorted pin-up ladies share space with miniature reproductions of half-empty fridges and dusty workspaces. In Lockhart’s carefully staged papier-mâché world, ubiquitous media images and personal narratives are levelled by humble and whimsical modes of presentation, prompting eccentric new associations in the mind of the viewer.

That Lockhart is best known for her work as an animator and cartoonist comes as no surprise: her cut-out animation, The Collagist, produced in collaboration with artist Marc Bell, in many ways steals the show. The film, which depicts the hands of an unseen artist as they cut, paste and draw on a desktop, acts as commentary for the rest of Lockhart’s work. It also lends her unusual assemblages the air of stage sets and movie props. From this cinematic perspective, a bloodied animal trap, a hunting knife and a pipe hanging beneath a postcard that reads “Tell Mumsy I love her” all become highly charged symbols of an uneasy narrative that has transpired outside of the gallery space. Similarly, a recreation of the collagist’s working surface becomes a self-reflexive meditation on the creative process
Though Lockhart’s objects refer back to familiar forms and tropes, her deft handling of materials and wry sense of humour ensure that “Give Up the Ghost” is more than mere appropriation. Instead, it offers a witty reflection on the often unnerving process of bringing objects to life. (4296 boul St-Laurent, Montreal QC)
 
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Featured artist

Amy Lockhart

          




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