home home about drawn and quarterly news artists shop shopping cart
Drawn and Quarterly Your Shopping Cart
Home About Artists Shop Events Press New Blog 211 Bernard Store Blog


News Briefs featuring Pablo Holmberg

( back )


EDEN and PICTURE THIS featured in Las Vegas Weekly's Year in Review

Updated March 4, 2011


1. Picture This, Lynda Barry Barry tackles some of the toughest questions imaginable in the realms of aesthetics, language development and even mental health in this inventive, relentlessly charming graphic novel/memoir posing as a how-to activity book.


2. Eden, Pablo Holmberg This collection of the Argentinean artist’s four-panel comic strips distills the medium to its purest form, telling super-short, romantic, fantastical and surprisingly complete stories using a few words, a few pictures and the manipulation of the passage of time
 
click here to read more


Featured artists

Lynda Barry
Pablo Holmberg

           Featured products

Picture This
Eden




  EDEN and THE WRONG PLACE reviewed by The Boston Globe

Updated March 4, 2011


My favorite is Brecht Evens’s “The Wrong Place,” an exhilaratingly sensual book about jealousy and desire among a group of hip, young urban adults and the leader of the pack, Robbie, a very elusive life of the party. Evens is a Flemish watercolorist who populates his pages with distinctive characters such as the mercurial, magnetic Robbie; his stand-in host, Gary, a Hendrix fan; and Waldo, a schlub whose sad story becomes part of the Robbie myth. The look of Evens’s illustrations is reminiscent of watercolor wash; figures seem to melt into one another. This fizzy little novel is all about buzz, gossip, sex, and having fun. It’s so busy and exuberant you wish you could join the party.

Two graphic novels dwell in fantasy: Pablo Holmberg’s delightful, minimalist “Eden” and Charles Burns’s queasy, creepy “X’ed Out.” Holmberg’s little book is decidedly nonlinear: This whimsical medieval folktale consists of a series of four-panel comic strips, each of which depicts a comic king and his queen and other characters in specific situations. The logic of “Eden” is not continuous but rather dreamlike. It is a charming book that leaves a sweet, surreal aftertaste. Burns’s first book since the epic, disquieting “Black Hole” is a kind of horror-show homage to the French comic “Tin Tin.” In it, teenager Doug, suffering from a head injury, follows his cat, Inky, through a hole in the wall, entering a universe populated by noseless thugs and monocular reptiles. Flashbacks and dreams alternate as Doug tries to remember what happened to him. This is the first installment of what Burns intends to be a three-part work. It’s scary and tantalizing and whets the appetite for the next unsettling piece.
click here to read more


Featured artists

Brecht Evens
Pablo Holmberg

           Featured products

The Wrong Place
Eden




The Montreal Gazette lists EDEN in its 2010 favourites

Updated March 4, 2011


Finally, I’m sorry if it’s getting repetitive reading paeans to Drawn & Quarterly, but as long as they keep publishing things as uniquely appealing as Eden by Pablo Holmberg (D & Q) the tributes will keep on coming. The Argentinian Holmberg works in miniatures, presenting a loosely linked series of self-contained four-panel single-page vignettes, many involving a small crowned creature of uncertain species. If “there are no kings inside the Gates of Eden,” as Holmberg quotes Bob Dylan, then what exactly is this monarch-like figure doing in this vaguely medieval paradise where weeping willows receive sympathy and mirrors are forgiven? As much as Holmberg’s creations might appear to be absurdist and whimsical—and they are, in the best of ways--a parallel-world logic slowly coheres. At times recalling artists as far-flung as Antoine de Saint-Exupery, Tove Jansson and George Herriman, Holmberg remains very much his own man and Eden its own world. The curious can explore that world further at www.kioskerman.com.
 
click here to read more


Featured artist

Pablo Holmberg

           Featured product

Eden




  The Comics Journal gives EDEN a glowing review

Updated February 18, 2011


Pablo Holmberg, better known in Argentina under his pen name of Kioskerman, makes comics that elude easy description. They’re about gaps, in-between places and events going on behind the scenes. They are frequently funny and are structured like a classic gag comic in terms of its four-panel grid, but his strips rarely have punchlines per se. The reader is immersed in a dreamy forest world without the benefit of an explanation or overarching narrative. Instead, the familiarity of the cartooning style and storytelling structure (a sketchy, relaxed and iconic line) to the reader makes one feel as though one has read the material before. There’s a little bit of Winsor McKay in Holmberg’s line, but there’s also the sadness and whimsy of Charles Schulz. One almost feels as though the strips we read here are “backstage” scenes–things the characters do and say in their downtime when they’re not having adventures. We witness them waiting, pining and simply hanging out with each other. One can almost imagine action happening off-panel as the King character navigates his environment.

As a result, these quiet scenes have a lyrical quality to them. Time is a crucial aspect of the storytelling here, where time is sometimes a cruel, almost tangible force that only foments longing. In some strips, this longing is relayed in a straightforward, almost sentimental fashion. In other strips, it’s far more oblique, bordering on comics-as-poetry in the way that Holmberg “rhymes” images and uses language in a less direct manner. Holmberg’s musings on children are especially affecting as he mixes text and visuals to get at the mysteries of the feelings behind parenthood. Eden in a sense is Holmberg’s attempt to get at the ineffable, to describe in a roundabout way what cannot be described. Or rather, the emotions one feels as a parent, a child or a lover can be described, but the description is not the experience. Eden succeeds because it manages to evoke the experience of the sublime in page after page. That experience is not necessarily a happy one; indeed, pain is a constant touchstone in this book. That’s both the pain we feel and the pain we try to avoid, as the strip about the wolf and the woman wanting to know why she criticizes those she loves indicates.

Eden is a deceptively simple book. Its components are simple to the point of occasional cliche’, but Holmberg’s arrangements are what make each page sing. It’s a book whose whole is greater than the sum of its parts. If one strip seems overtly sentimental, the strip following it will have a more evasive or cynical bent. The forest kingdom setting is crucial in knitting these various emotional through-lines together, as basic human emotions (like a son wanting to get to know his father) are placed in a fantastic context. This is the respect in which it’s most like Peanuts, where frequently raw and painful emotions are filtered through a charming and comedic line. At the same time, Holmberg is clearly concerned that his book should be beautiful like McKay’s, that it should give the reader something to look at. Without the sumptuous backgrounds to juxtapose against the series of conflicting feelings in the book, the emotions presented would feel a little more base, a little more obvious. By cloaking life’s unanswerable questions within the deep mysteries of a fantasy forest where the plants, the animals and even the stars are sentient, Holmberg has created a world where the language of poetry, the language of everyday speech and the visual language of his drawings are all the same thing.
click here to read more


Featured artist

Pablo Holmberg

           Featured product

Eden




See Magazine calls EDEN a "singular work of delicate beauty and wonder"

Updated February 18, 2011


The comic strip is following the comic book in maturing as a bona fide artistic and literary medium.
Last year provided the collected Children of the Atom, Dave Lapp’s poignant, existential and utterly incomparable chronicle of two innocents with nothing but each other in a simultaneously beautiful, threatening and incomprehensible world. It’s one of the most unique, esthetically accomplished of all comic strips.

"In his series Eden, first serialized online and set in a fairy tale world where the magical is everyday, Argentinean artist Pablo Holmberg has fashioned an equally singular work of delicate beauty and wonder. Like Lapp, Holmberg sees no reason to limit the comic strip to a gag medium, which it’s been for most of its history. Instead, he infuses the form with beguiling fancifulness and unexpected depth.

Holmberg remains aware of the conventions of his art: many strips still utilize the classic gag format, with the succession of panels leading to a crafted punchline. Nonetheless, how many gag strips have punchlines as charming, unexpected and imaginative as these?

Let’s take a handful of examples featuring what is apparently the king of the realm; it’s never made clear what the odd little creature is, but never mind. In one instance, he’s afloat in a small boat, and is informed by a bird that a storm is coming.

“You heard him,” the king says after the messenger departs. “We’re going home.” Then we see the boat rise skyward, resting upon some giant undersea lizard, which stands to full height and starts walking.

On the very next page, the king captures the spirit of an animal he’s hunted down; pleased, he proceeds to use it as a bedside lamp.

Or the funniest of all – conveying something of the character’s personality — is what the crowned, fur-collared little being does to an impertinent fish.

(By contrast, some strips have fun playing with fairy tale convention — as when the king tries to awaken a sleeping beauty with a kiss … then sits, utterly befuddled, when it fails to work.)

But Holmberg also uses the gag-strip structure for his own purposes — leading the reader to truisms and epiphanies instead. In one instance, a bird cuts short the sobbing of a forest creature with its single-note translation of a single word: “Hope.” This could have been delivered on the level of a New Age greeting card message, but it’s unexpected and moving.

Another touching strip has two brothers talking in their darkened bedroom at night. One asks where their father is; the other replies he’s working late, to feed them. “Why are you crying?” the latter then asks. “I’ll try to eat less,” comes the reply. And in yet another instance, there’s Holmberg’s affecting explanation of where rain comes from.

There’s such a delicacy and romantic sensibility at work. When a bird awakens an odd little creature in its bed, it rises to light a giant lamp on a cliffside: “The first star shows up later each time,” the king says, gazing from the ground far, far away. In another strip, a lame man and a mermaid dance together … underwater.

It’s Holmberg’s statements on nothing less than the nature of love that reflects his work at its most outstanding. Take the episode where the king and his birdlike female companion have a quarrel, part, fume … and reconcile tenderly in the final panel.

Most moving of all is when a man joins a woman, who’s clearly been waiting for him, in a picturesque valley. Then in the abrupt concluding frame, we see two tombstones, one of which says to the other: “I was waiting for you.” It’s the outcome of all love stories.

Eden is a work of sometimes almost poetic beauty — pure, heartfelt and true. It’s so tender, so affirming, so reassuring. It’s a work of genuine art that demands discovery.
 
click here to read more


Featured artist

Pablo Holmberg

           Featured product

Eden




  The Comics Reporter falls for EDEN

Updated February 15, 2011


Eden
posted January 13, 2011
Creator: Pablo Holmberg
Publishing Information: Drawn And Quarterly, softcover, 120 pages, 2010, $16.95
Ordering Numbers: 9781770460089 (ISBN13)

Pablo Holmberg's Eden provides testimony to the power of print collection. It forces reconsideration of work that when seen in drips and drabs on-line failed to make anywhere near a collective impression. Having this much of the material in front of you, in a format designed to entice you into reading it cover to cover, might intenerate the hardest heart. Holding Eden in one's lap, the reader may better pick up on Holmberg's idiosyncratic rhythms, cartoons that plunge ahead towards their mostly mournful conclusions. Holmberg's work takes great advantage of comics ability to shift scenes for meaning's sake, roaring 10,000 miles in physical space from first to last pictures or shifting gears from rapture to melancholy in two panels time with the apparent ease of someone pushing buttons at an Automat. It's a work that can both sneak up on you and roar past your head. The subject matter further flatters the book being carried around and mused over, taken far away from a computer screen and curled up with on a sofa or outside on the porch, even furtively sampled from while sitting in a too-warm car waiting for a train to arrive. I think I liked it fifteen percent more reading it again over the holidays than I did pushing through it at my desk on a Tuesday in October.

Eden may hit very hard with some readers. Holmberg serves up sentimentalism at its most forceful and context-challenging; that it also indulges in maudlin self-flattery may slip past unnoticed if it catches its target in the most receptive frame of mind. The cartoonist's fantasy characters (medieval humans, talking animals, forces of nature) are frequently separated from that which brings them the most joy: some are reunited, many are not, and a few are left to deal with that knowledge in a way that allows them to cope. There are a smattering of strips that play against the group's overwhelming twee qualities for humor's sake, but not a lot of them. Eden's attractively drawn, which helps: comics ability to host anything on the page with conviction and make it an effective carrier for just about any idea gets a fair workout here, as does the size of characters on the page and in the context of their surroundings as a way of conveying emotion. Now, obviously, one's appetite for romantic whimsy and expressions of cleverly-phrased, spiritual ardency may be severely tested. I have friends that would toss this book at the wall after about two minutes trying to choke down its pages, and maybe take a swing at me for handing it to them. It also definitely feels like a young person's strip: a bit scattered; confident that it's communicating something in a few cases when everyone but the author may be baffled; given to mopey, grand gestures that don't always feel earned. Eden reads like a precursor to more focused, sustained efforts -- in this exact format or something far removed. Still, I bet Eden takes a lot of people by surprise, at least those lucky enough to be able to give it the time it deserves, and I wouldn't be surprised to see it slip onto the bottom end of a lot of best-of-year lists. I'll consider it for mine.
click here to read more


Featured artist

Pablo Holmberg

           Featured product

Eden




Eden and Picture This in the Las Vegas Weekly Best of 2010

Updated February 9, 2011


The Year in Review: Books, Comics & Games
Las Vegas Weekly Staff
Thursday December 30, 2010


COMICS
J. CALEB MOZZOCCO
1. Picture This, Lynda Barry Barry tackles some of the toughest questions imaginable in the realms of aesthetics, language development and even mental health in this inventive, relentlessly charming graphic novel/memoir posing as a how-to activity book.

2. Eden, Pablo Holmberg This collection of the Argentinean artist’s four-panel comic strips distills the medium to its purest form, telling super-short, romantic, fantastical and surprisingly complete stories using a few words, a few pictures and the manipulation of the passage of time.

3. Temperance, Cathy Malkasian Blessed with a Dr. Seuss-like ability to evoke the most serious problems and bleakest emotions in personalized, original, timeless fantasy elements, Malkasian has constructed a graphic epic involving a handful of colorful, tragic characters and their interlocking lives.

4. Flesh and Bone, Julia Gfrörer In delicate lines and occasionally furious cross-hatching, Gfrörer renders a strange romance about a young man mourning his deceased lover and the witch who helps him when no one else can.

5. Werewolves of Montepellier, Jason A successful jewel thief disguises himself as a werewolf during heists, eventually attracting the attention of real, actual werewolves in Jason’s latest deadpan dramedy masterpiece. While that might sound like the protagonist’s most urgent problem, his doomed crush on neighbor-turned-friend Audrey is the only thing truly eating him.
 
click here to read more


Featured artists

Lynda Barry
Pablo Holmberg

           Featured products

Picture This
Eden




  ACME NOVELTY LIBRARY 20 and EDEN on Graphic Novel Reporter's 2010 Favorites list

Updated December 21, 2010


GNR's 2010 Favorites

As 2010 winds down, we bring you our selections for the best that the year had to offer. It was a great year for graphic novels and manga, and this list is a look at our favorites. Add your comments below to share your own personal favorites!

GRAPHIC NOVELS

by John Hogan

Acme Novelty Library #20
by Chris Ware
Drawn & Quarterly
ISBN: 978-1770460201

The prolific and offbeat genius of Chris Ware once again comes to life in the story of an Omaha businessman. Wildly inventive and engaging, Ware's Acme Novelty Library series continues to get better and better.

...

OUR REVIEWERS' PICKS

Peter Gutierrez:

I think a lot of my favorites this year were shared by many—books like Smile, for example. So here are some titles that might not be as well known:

Eden
by Pablo Holmberg
Drawn and Quarterly
ISBN: 978-1770460089
At times almost too whimsical for their own good, the four-panel strips collected here can nonetheless be counted on to startle you with their combination of imagination and profundity.
click here to read more


Featured artists

Chris Ware
Pablo Holmberg

           Featured products

Acme Novelty Library Volume 20
Eden




ForeWord Reviews recommends DENYS WORTMAN'S NEW YORK and EDEN

Updated December 21, 2010


Still More Gift-Giving Ideas for Comics Fans

by Peter Gutiérrez

Certainly comics and trade paperback-style graphic novels are more affordable than other reading material you might give this holiday season. But what about when you want to go all out and spoil someone (maybe yourself?) with comics-related books that are as substantial and artful as anything else you’ll find on the shelves? In my Nov/Dec ForeWord column, I suggested some gift-worthy, archived editions and art books. Here are a few more titles that are sure to put a smile on the face of a discerning comics reader.

Denys Wortman’s New York: Portrait of the City in the 1930s and 1940s (Drawn and Quarterly, 978-1-77046-013-3) From all accounts, longtime newspaper cartoonist Wortman was a class act, and in this book, editors James Sturm and Brandon Elston have showcased much of his nearly forgotten work in a suitably classy presentation. The penciling in these full-page, single-panel cartoons (Wortman disliked the term “gag”) is wondrously evocative in its own right—clever captions that capture timeless human foibles are a bonus.

...

Eden (Drawn and Quarterly, 978-1-77046-008-9) Finally, a collection to recommend for young readers as well as adults. In fact, it’s the adults who may respond most powerfully to the simple wisdom contained in the pages of this whimsical fantasy; kids will just love how cute and funny the story is. Previously published as web comics, Pablo Holmberg’s work already has the feel of a classic.
 
click here to read more


Featured artists

Pablo Holmberg
Denys Wortman

           Featured products

Denys Wortman's New York
Eden




  Omnivoracious loves THE WILD KINGDOM and EDEN as off-beat gifts for this holiday season

Updated December 14, 2010


Gift Book Suggestions for the Imaginative, the Curious, the Weird

by Jeff VanderMeer

Two of these are hard to find; six of these are not...

Looking for something off-beat book-wise to give as a gift this holiday season? Looking for something that’s imaginative and different? Something that your friends, family, or office buddies might not already have? Something with nice production values?

As the co-creator of a quirky gift book this year, The Kosher Guide to Imaginary Animals, I've come up with some field-tested suggestions mostly from the last couple of years that might just do the trick. Because I am heartless I have included two titles in the photos that you’ll have to search relentlessly to acquire: Catherynne M. Valente’s Under in the Mere and Ellen Kushner’s The Man With the Knives. But because I am also not without empathy, I’ve added a couple not pictured that are more readily available…

...

The Wild Kingdom by Kevin Huizenga (Drawn & Quarterly) - In The Wild Kingdom,Glenn Ganges blindly interacts with the nature of his suburban neighborhood: dead houseplants, a recipe for graysquirrel brain, and pigeons eating discarded french fries in the parking lot of a fast-food joint. Starting off wordless, The Wild Kingdom grows more complex page by page, ending with encyclopedic entries, biographical excerpts, anthropologic flowcharts, and a cataclysmic encounter of nature and technology. It’s a beautifully constructed book, with marvelous endpapers and great production values.

Eden by Pablo Holmberg (Drawn & Quarterly) – Quixotic, surreal, absurd, never cute but always lively, this tiny trade paperback shows off Holmberg’s talent for episodic comics that sometimes veer off into very strange places. A perfect stocking stuffer for fans of Woodring et al.
click here to read more


Featured artists

Kevin Huizenga
Pablo Holmberg

           Featured products

Wild Kingdom
Eden




Newsarama reviews the "pure comics" of EDEN

Updated December 9, 2010


Review: Eden

by J. Caleb Mozzocco
Newsarama
December 2nd, 2010

Eden is, in its Middle Eastern origins and the Western tradition that sprang from them, a literal paradise, a sort of heaven on earth, a place of absolute perfection, the way things could have been—should have been—if mistakes weren’t made.

I’m as sure as I can possibly be without actually asking artist Pablo Holmberg that he didn’t choose Eden as the name of his comic strips in order to comment on their quality. The most likely origin is Bob Dylan’s “Gates of Eden”, as one of Holmberg’s pieces quotes the lyric “There are no kings inside the gates of Eden,” which is written on a sign hanging from a gate and confronting one of the recurring characters, who wears a crown and a coat with ermine trim. (“Don’t let it intimidate you,” says another recurring character, from the other side of the gate.)

It’s an exceptionally fitting title though, and the metaphor works. The comics collected in Eden are perfect and, even more uniquely, pure comics—they are comics that can only be comics, they do things that can only be done in comics and as comics. Each individual, page-long piece makes a statement, asks a question or evokes a mood or feeling through a combination of words, pictures and the manipulation of time that is only possible through sequential images.

The majority of Holmberg’s strips are four-panels. In their original, online iteration those four panels ran horizontally, but in Drawn and Quarterly’s collection, a perfect little six-inch-by-six-inch square, 120-page paperback, they are reorganized to run in two-by-two square-shaped grids. A handful of one-panel, single-image cartoons make for rule-proving exceptions.


The cast and setting emerge slowly, more slowly than the tone and style.

There’s the aforementioned king character, referred to in one strip as Forest King, a bipedal creature of uncertain species, but perhaps of the same genus as Dave Sim’s Cerebus (like comics’ most famous aardvark, Holberg’s King evolves quickly; the king loses his prominent nostrils and forehead, his ears lengthen and he becomes quite simplified over the course of a few appearances). There’ s a yellow, bird-like anthropomorphical female character, with a cockatoo-like crest. There are an awful lot of humans, who generally only appear once. And there are angels, devils, bugs, birds, spirits, giants, monsters, stars and skeletons. There are talking trees and flowers, many animals from our world and a few that seem familiar but alien. There’s a long, prehensile-tailed cat and at least one mermaid.


The setting is time-less, but not too modern; pastoral, even Arcadian, but with more than enough civilization to provide material for gags and observations that are applicable to modern readers. The fact that the artist is from Argentina tempts me to refer to his work as magical realism, but in fact the world-view is less magically-realistic and more medieval and mythological.

Obviously then, the content varies rather widely. There are some very silly strips, some darkly funny ones, some that simply explore fantastic images and characters, some that draw parallels between different scenes or characters to tell a short story, some that are greeting card cute and some that are romantic. “Romantic” in the sense of dealing with romance, anyway; all of Holmberg’s strips are romantic in the literary sense of idealism, imagination and intense emotion.

Each strip is its own little story, with beginnings middles and ends, although the stories tend to be something closer to poems—poems of words and pictures and time, or sometimes just pictures and time, or perhaps pictures and ideas and time. That is, they are comics. Pure comics.
 
click here to read more


Featured artist

Pablo Holmberg

           Featured product

Eden




  Jeff VanderMeer loves EDEN, WILD KINGDOM, and THE WRONG PLACE!

Updated November 23, 2010


Drawn & Quarterly: Pablo Holmberg, Kevin Huizenga, and Brecht Evens

by Jeff VanderMeer
November 20th, 2010

Thousands of books arrive at our house every year because of the various reviewing gigs like the NYT and Omnivoracious, and because of Ann editing Weird Tales. Some publishers, time and again, become anonymous in that context. The books all look the same, or there’s something about the format that becomes anonymous.

Others stand out by a mile because they’re recognizably coming at readers from a unique or interesting perspective, and because they vary their formats and design approaches while remaining true to some central focus.

Drawn & Quarterly always puts out cool books. When they come in the door, I can’t just throw them on the stack.

Today, for example, we got Eden by Pablo Holmberg, The Wild Kingdom by Kevin Huizenga, and The Wrong Place by Brecht Evens. The art style of each, the world view behind each, and the size of each book are entirely different. But they share the D&Q vision. They’ve all got great end papers. They each are in the format best-suited for them (Wild Kingdom as a little hardcover, cover image printed on the boards, for example.) Take a look at some samples below, and definitely look for all three. Extremely awesome stuff—and am enjoying the kind of “eavesdropping on party conversation” style of the Evens.
click here to read more


Featured artists

Kevin Huizenga
Brecht Evens
Pablo Holmberg

           Featured products

The Wrong Place
Wild Kingdom
Eden




The Washington City Paper reviews PABLO HOLMBERG's EDEN

Updated November 2, 2010


International Ink: Pirates, Ghosts, and Wookies, Oh My!

by Mike Rhode

Books for review have been piling up again, but the fall con schedule has been working against me. Here’s some quick hits of material I’ve read recently.

Eden by Pablo Holmberg (Drawn & Quarterly, $16.95) is a surprise. Holmberg is an Argentinian web cartoonist, and this book collects his four-panel strip, which is full of lovely moments. The characters are anthropomorphic animals at times, humans at other times, and the two strips on pp. 70-71 can be used to sum up the appeal of the book. On the first page, a walking donkey who’s a king in a red gown and a crown hands a blue vase to a cockatoo in a dress, telling her “I fixed your vase. Although I couldn’t find the piece with the hummingbird. It’s as if it disappeared.” The final panel shows a live full-color hummingbird in a tree, singing to the sunset. The facing page shows a man in a tam-o-shanter sneaking into a house, thinking “10 seconds, just give me 10 seconds” as he sinks into an easychair. As he thinks, “One…” three children rush onto his lap in the last scene.
 
click here to read more


Featured artist

Pablo Holmberg

           Featured product

Eden




  Shhh, I'm Reading blogger loses himself to PABLO HOMLBERG'S EDEN

Updated October 5, 2010


Losing Myself to Pablo Holmberg’s Eden

Right when I needed a little whimsy I came across the Argentinean comic and Drawn & Quarterly scribe Pablo Holmberg. It’s like that sometimes with books; they just show up as needed. I’ve been reading a lot of Heavy Metal back issues and Northlanders and after all that viking slayer and sci-fi soft core business I was craving a comic that was a little gentler, less blood and brawn but no less raw. A little closer to the heart than the loins if you will. Holmberg’s little epiphany of a book Eden is incredible. In one sense it is a non serial collection of 4 panel graphic koans on themes of yearning, loss and the natural world. But of course they work as a whole because all of these ideas loosely constitute what it means to be a human being. Eden is a bit like a capsule collection of the grand folly of living. There were individual panels that brought me to tears. And before you conclude that only a sap could be so profoundly affected by a comic, go and pick up a copy. I dare you to be unmoved.
click here to read more


Featured artist

Pablo Holmberg

           Featured product

Eden





copyright ©2010 drawn & quarterly