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News Briefs featuring Lisa Hanawalt

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Lisa Hanawalt on Live Wire Radio

Updated January 7, 2014


"Live Wire 231: Brian Michael Bendis, John Gorham, Brandie Posey, 1939 Ensemble"
Live Wire, Sep 2013
 
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Featured artist

Lisa Hanawalt

          



  The Washington Post Interviews Lisa Hanawalt at the Small Press Expo

Updated January 7, 2014


"Interview: Creature Features"
By Shauna Miller
The Washington Post, Sep 12 2013

"What do dogs want? In the mind of Lisa Hanawalt, they yearn for salt licks in the shape of human legs and houses made of old fish.
The Brooklyn illustrator and comic-book artist’s ideas always “start with something that happened in the real world,” says Hanawalt, who will appear at Bethesda’s Small Press Expo this weekend. “When I draw, I’ll start to riff on simple ideas or interactions I’ve had.”
Sometimes, that’s reading Martha Stewart Living, which led to Hanawalt’s series “How We Can Tell Martha Stewart’s Drunk.” (Giveaways: “Bows tied in the toilet paper” or “biscotti in a big thing of vodka.”)
Those pieces are compiled in Hanawalt’s new book, “My Dirty Dumb Eyes,” which is also full of the discomforting, entrancing half animal, half people she’s made her trademark. “When I was about 8, I drew myself as a cat person because, in my head, it was the coolest thing that could happen,” she says.
Two of her previous mini-comics, “Stay Away From Other People” and “I Want You #1,” both from 2009, won the prestigious Ignatz Award, putting her in the company of comics giants. She’s also done work for The New York Times, Vanity Fair and The Hairpin, which publishes her illustrated film reviews. (Her viral-hit review of “War Horse” is funnier than anything made solely of words could ever be.)
Generally, though, the UCLA-trained Hanawalt, age “medium-young,” publishes work directly to her website, lisahanawalt.com. “Posting online gets me seen by art directors,” she says. “I wouldn’t advise someone else to try this approach, though, because the pay is infrequent and random.”
As for profitable gigs, Hanawalt contributes to Random House’s Hazlitt site and recently illustrated “Benny’s Brigade,” a children’s book that follows the adventures of a walrus and some slugs.
Her most recent project, started after Nike’s “Just Do It” slogan popped into her brain during procrastination ennui, can be seen on her Instagram account, lisadraws. Corporate logos pair up with off-color slogans: “Subway: Smell Bread”; Chevrolet: Get Your Laws Off My Truck Nutz”; “McDonald’s: I Love Something. Is This It?”
As with Hanawalt’s other works, the doodles riff on everyday interactions — in this case, ones she felt she had little control over.
“I was angry that a slogan would be so embedded,” she says, “so this is getting out frustration about that. And McDonald’s is following me on Twitter!”
Hanawalt at SPX: Saturday at 5:30 p.m., Hanawalt will be on a “performative panel” with cartoonist R. Sikoryak, Sam Henderson (“The Magic Whistle”), Michael Kupperman (“Tales Designed to Thrizzle”), Anders Nilsen (“Rage of Poseidon”) and others."
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Featured artist

Lisa Hanawalt

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My Dirty Dumb Eyes




Take a Trip to Lisa Hanawalt's Greenpoint Studio with The Paris Review!

Updated November 7, 2013


"The Eyes Have It: A Visit with Lisa Hanawalt"

The Paris Review, August 1, 2013
by Yevgeniya Traps

"If the title of her “one-woman anthology” of comics is to be believed, Lisa Hanawalt’s eyes are dirty and dumb. We should all be so lucky: according to My Dirty Dumb Eyes, they allow her to imagine fashionable animals in haute-couture hats, give her insight into the secret lives of chefs (did you know that “Mark Bittman is a vegan before 6 P.M. and a cannibal after 11 P.M.”?), and help her envision some unconventional uses for wedding registry gifts.

With its leitmotif blend of whimsy, wistfulness, and a touch of scatology, the book is funny and life-of-the-party loud. In person, however, Hanawalt is a little shy and a little earnest. It’s not that she takes herself seriously—it’s just that talking about her work seems to feel a little weird. Which is not to say that her comics are improvised or intuitive; in fact, she maintains a running list of ideas with Notational Velocity, working and reworking concepts until they are just right. This demands patience and perseverance: sometimes the idea lies dormant for years until it’s finally time for it to come out and play.

When we met last month in her Greenpoint studio, Hanawalt proudly showed off her Wacom Cintiq, “the most incredible modern invention—besides a dishwasher” she’s ever owned (it’s an interactive pen that allows her to draw and edit directly on her computer screen), talked about some of her recent comics (“It’s all toilet-based humor”), and considered life after art school (she went to UCLA) and the differences between LA and NY.

CoverI think the way I was looking at this book was like, This is the world through my eyes. That was the easiest way to explain what the hell this book was. I couldn’t point to another book, and be like, That’s the book I’m going to make. So okay, the world through my eyes, what is that world? Well, I see a lot of dirty stuff, and I see a lot of dumb stuff. And it’s sort of just me, trying to be more debased or humorous as a way of entertaining myself.
I just wanted some pieces that weren’t narrative. Just two-page spreads that relate to some of the other comics in the book. This is the most fun thing for me to draw. Comics take a lot of energy. I have to write them, storyboard them, then make sure that they actually work as narrative. And this is my relaxation, where I can still feel like I’m working, but I can kind of put my brain on autopilot a little bit. I can just pick one theme, like, There are dogs, they live in the jungle, what kind of house do they live in? and just have fun. I think a lot of time, when I’m making art, I’m trying to get into a state of childlike play, where I’m not self-conscious, I’m not worried about what the outcome is going to be. I’m just having fun. With these, I think I key into that quicker than with any other sort of work.

paintsI’ve always liked writing. Even when I was in art school and thought I was going to be a gallery painter, I liked to pair my artwork with writing. And so that naturally led to drawing comics. I like to tell stories. I like to work out things I’m going through in my life and hide them in fictional stories. This piece that I’m working on now, about cowboys, it came from this thought I had. I like to watch westerns, but I think about the fact that they ride horses in westerns a lot, because I love horses. But they hardly ever acknowledge them or discuss the fact that this is their primary mode of transportation, and so in this story I am exploring the genre while acknowledging that, and it’s a conversation between the rider and his horse while he’s being chased by a vague group of people. You never quite see the bad guys or find out who they are. So it’s like a reverse of the standard western story.

Often I’ll get an idea from watching a movie. This one, I was watching The Misfits, which is Marilyn Monroe’s last movie, and there’s this part where they are trying to capture the wild horses. So I kind of took off from that, and turned the people into dogs, and made the horse much bigger, and added helicopters just to make it more modern and exciting. I watch a lot of action movies too.

fliesI think shifting the focus is part of what I do in the movie reviews I write, as well. I love watching movies, even really stupid movies. And I really enjoy them, but I also like to sort of pick out what’s ridiculous about them and kind of make up my own little ideas. It’s all about making funny connections for me.

I’ve always drawn a lot. When I was five, six, I drew myself as a cat a lot, because I was obsessed with cats. And then, as soon as I took my first riding lesson, I started drawing horses. I switched from cats to horses. I think I drew as a way to keep myself from getting bored in class. At first, my teachers got mad at me, but then I think they realized it was my way of listening—I couldn’t pay attention unless I was drawing. So I quickly became one of the best drawers in the school, I was the girl who drew all the time. And I never really stopped.

parrotI think I see myself as both things, a cartoonist and an artist. It kind of depends on who I’m talking to, who I introduce myself as. If I’m talking to a comedian, then I’ll say I’m a cartoonist, because that implies that I write and I’m funny, and I have more of a connection to them. If I’m talking to a designer, I’ll say I’m an illustrator, because that’s something that they’ll understand more. But I do everything. I haven’t done a lot of shows for galleries. It turns out it’s really hard to do that. And even though in art school they are sort of prepping you for that and that seems to be the expectation, they don’t quite explain that you don’t immediately have solo shows in Chelsea when you graduate. And I was doing little zines and stuff the whole time I was in college, so it didn’t feel like a transition, it didn’t feel like, Oh, I’m just going to stop drawing and start doing comics. Because I never stopped or started either. This whole time I’ve continued to make large drawings. It’s just when I was in college I made six-foot-tall paintings. My scale has gotten a little smaller.

monitorI like to read a lot, so the writing part grew out of that. I always kept a diary. And when I was in high school, I had a LiveJournal, and I wrote in it everyday. It’s funny now, because LiveJournal is so lame, but I think it really helped me learn how to write, how to take an experience and make it into something that was like a story.

Often, it starts with me writing. Just scribbling down some ideas, and I’ll write down several bullet points that I’d like to have in the story. Oh, maybe the guy dies at the end, I’ll just write that down real quick. And maybe some phrases that I want to be said during the comic. It really isn’t a beginning-to-end thing. I’ll just fill in as I go, and maybe between pages six and seven, I’ll think there needs to be something else, and I’ll add that in. It’s very much a collage process. And then I’ll sketch it out, and write in the words, and try not to worry about it too much because I know I can go back and change it, and it’s just a first draft. With comics, I’ll tend to try and say less, because I want to show, not tell, what’s happening. So I try not to use too much text. Unless that is a character trait—that a character talks too much.

BooksIf I get an idea, and it makes me either laugh or I think it’s going to be funny, I try to figure out how to do it. Sometimes, the idea is fully formed, and I just have to figure out if I need to add anything and make sure it’s not too cliché or something. It really depends—some comics I’ll start and then I’ll let them sit in a file for months, because they don’t quite work. I have things in my book that were ideas in my written-ideas-folder for years before I actually decided they were worth drawing. On my computer, I have this program Notational Velocity, and it’s just like notes and notes, and it’s a mess, but I just have comics ideas and movie reviews. It’s nice because I can search by word. So when Lucky Peach came to me, and they said, We want you to do something, I was like, I wonder if I have any food-related ideas, and I looked it up, and I had this whole thing about the secret lives of chefs. And it’s like, I had this idea for a year, but now let’s turn it into a comic. Sometimes, I wish there was more in there. That’s the hardest part for me, just writing down ideas when I have them, no matter how stupid they are. I’ll always get ideas as I’m falling asleep at night, and it’s such a drag to get up and write it down, but I’m always glad when I do, even if it’s nonsense. Usually it turns into something.

tigerI’m not a diary cartoonist, the way some people are. I really like diary comics, I just can’t draw that way. I’ve tried, and it just doesn’t feel right to me. The closest I’ll get to that is to mask myself as a moose or something. The things where I draw myself as an animal are the most personal, the most autobiographical.

I like doing funny stuff, but I’m also experimenting more and more with doing stuff that’s sad. I think that’s much harder. Because if you do something that’s supposed to be sad or emotional, I think it could quite easily feel false, or it just wouldn’t work, and it would be boring at its very worst. I have certain things in the book that the editor would say, Well, this one isn’t very funny, or, It’s not as funny as the other ones, and I’d say, I’m okay with that, I want to throw that in there. I think it grounds the humor a little bit to have comics that are more about anxiety or sadness.

I’ve been in Brooklyn for four years. When I was in LA, I drew a lot more cars and car accidents. And when I first moved here, I drew a lot of scenes that took place on the subway. I guess modes of transportation are a huge thing in my work for some reason. I haven’t figured out why yet. I think it’s because I kind of don’t like to travel, I don’t like to go places, I kind of just like to stay in one place. So I think about that a lot.

wood flyI have four studio mates: John, Chris, Sam, and Roy. We all work very individually. These guys have been in here much longer than me, I just joined last fall. But we definitely ask each other for input sometimes. It’s nice to be in the studio for that reason. Before I was in here, a year before, I was in a studio with six female cartoonists. Pizza Island was the name of that studio. It was different, because it was much smaller, and we were all crammed in, and our desks were so close to each other, and the guys here talk about their periods a little less. But it had a similar impact on me, as far as being able to turn around and say, Hey, what do you think of this? What should I do now? I’d never really been in a studio environment before then, since school.

I try to come in every day. It’s funny, when I was in the previous studio, I definitely worked half there, and half at home. But, with this, I really try to have all of my work be here. Partly as an anxiety thing, so I can go home and really turn off the part of my brain that thinks about work all the time. I think that’s the problem with being freelance, I’m always kind of working and thinking about work. So not having a drawing table at home has kind of helped me shut off.

cutoutsTypically I come in kind of late, around eleven or so. And I’ll usually just noodle around on my computer for an hour, and then I’ll get to work. It totally depends on what I’m working on. When I was doing some character design stuff, I was in here early every day and left at six. But when I’m doing my own projects, I could stay here till eleven at night or I could leave early, it really depends on how I’m feeling that day, if I’m feeling creative or not.

I mostly look at Twitter. I read the fashion blogs. I read the news. I look at Tumblr. Maybe I’ll look at blogs with more images so that I can think about how to start making some of my own and stop looking at the Internet. The most inspiring images to me are always landscapes of nature, probably because I live in the city. I want what I can’t have, and I want sprawling green landscapes and forests and stuff. A lot of my work tends to be very nature-based.

elephantI think with the Internet, and looking at Tumblr, there is just a constant flow of images. My brain just feels like a blender of all that stuff. It’s exciting, and it’s also fatiguing. I think it sometimes creates the sense that everyone is constantly creating content and putting it online, and I feel pressure to do the same. Yesterday, I was feeling frustrated, because there is so much pressure to have a regular stream of content online, and then to have a separate stream of content that is not online that then becomes a book that is all previously unpublished material. And my book is obviously stuff that’s been published before online, there’s just forty pages of stuff that hasn’t been published before. And hopefully people won’t care that much. It’s just too much, making work takes so much time, I can’t do both all the time.

I don’t know that I’ll ever do a six-hundred page graphic novel, but I am writing longer and longer stories. I mean, in this book, most of the short fictional pieces are quite short. I think I’ll start expanding those as I get more comfortable doing that. But I also want to do some longer journalistic pieces. I think I’ll always have this one-woman-anthology approach, that’s just the way I work, it’s always going to be a grab-bag of styles, and hopefully it will all thematically tie into each other in some way."
 
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Featured artist

Lisa Hanawalt

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My Dirty Dumb Eyes




  New D&Q titles wickedly funny, according to Fast Forward Weekly

Updated September 11, 2013


"New batch of Drawn & Quarterly releases wickedly funny: Comics find humour in everything from pop culture to parenting"

by Bryn Evans
Fast Forward Weekly, July 18, 2013

A pack of new Drawn and Quarterly releases proves just how wickedly versatile humour is within the comics medium.

The best of the bunch is Lisa Hanawalt’s My Dirty Dumb Eyes, a psychoanalytic grab bag of comics, sketches, movie reviews and other assorted oddities.

Her illustrated review of Steven Spielberg’s War Horse gained some online attention recently, with its mix of awkward personal confession, digressive pop-culture tidbits, observations on how stupid audiences can be, and a sharp critical eye. The other movie reviews are equally hilarious. Rise of the Planet of the Apes is a paranoid rumination on why she hates monkeys, while her review of Drive tries to determine where Ryan Gosling’s psychotic character sits on the scale of stoic versus autistic action heroes.

The rest of the pieces combine the same love of the personal and cultural, like a scatological mediation on artistic practice. (Hanawalt’s practice, anyway.) Add a healthy predilection for drawing giant, life-like lizards in lingerie and you have the ideal kind of cartoon collection — something to be randomly dipped into again and again. She notes that alternate titles included Dick Lizards and Boob Dogs: A Memoir and What We Draw About When We Draw About Sex Bugs. Both descriptions are equally apt.

Another collection, Animals With Sharpies, is exactly what it sounds like — animals writing insults, confessions and assorted dumb things with a black Sharpie. If you liked Toronto-based illustrator Graham Roumieu’s bitter and hilarious Bigfoot books, you’ll love this.

The series of one-page painted panels combine the same knuckle-headed comedy (animals have terrible grammar, apparently) with a kind of deeply depressing, Schopenhauerian philosophy. It’s a kid’s book for smarty-pants grown-ups.

That isn’t meant as a backhanded compliment. Like Hanawalt’s collection, Animals is the best kind of cartoon book — less the sum of its parts and more made for maximum flipability. Though there are a few moments that are simply a rumination on “What would an animal say if it could talk,” Canadian creators Michael Dumontier and Neil Farber are more interested in the idea of what you can do with a plain rectangular panel and a Sharpie — everything from simple lines and shading, to jokes, Morse code, lists, scribbles, Bible passages and more.

Tom Gauld’s collected series of snappy and sardonic comic strips, You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack, first appeared in The Guardian, and it’s great to have all of these poisonous little gems in one place.

The Scottish cartoonist’s clean, designer-like style suits the bitter content, with diminutive stick figures, maps and diagrams cataloguing a course of modern failure and disillusionment. It also serves as a deadly attack on artistic pretentiousness, taking shots at just about everyone — critics, writers, musicians and academics. (The title refers to science fiction’s marginalization outside so-called “proper literature.”)

The ghost of Edward Gorey is an obvious presence as well, with many of the strips displaying the same faux-Victorian language and dry, macabre humour. Gauld can be relentlessly depressing, but hilariously so. You’ll want to gorge on the comics, but that might prove to be too much for one sitting.

Finally, Quebec’s Guy Delisle (Pyongyang, Burma Chronicles) returns with another autobiographical tale. Unlike his earlier travelogues, A User’s Guide to Neglectful Parenting is much closer to home, a series of comic strips detailing the gentle hijinks and varied misadventures of fatherhood.

Delisle’s oft-grim sensibility and mischievousness packs a bigger bite here, with his two young children repeatedly falling victim to their father’s twisted sense of humour.

The slim volume offers a different side to Delisle’s cartooning, appearing more like a collection of Sunday morning strips than a graphic novel. It’s a quick read, with the sparse panels and pages racing from joke to joke.

I wouldn’t call Delisle’s approach to parenting neglectful — it’s too involved and witty to be such. It’s traumatic, crass and occasionally cruel, perhaps, but certainly not neglectful.
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Michael Dumontier & Neil Farber
Tom Gauld
Lisa Hanawalt

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You're All Just Jealous Of My Jetpack
Animals With Sharpies
My Dirty Dumb Eyes




Worn spotllights Lisa Hanawalt's comics about Anna Wintour!

Updated September 11, 2013


"Art: Rumours I’ve Heard about Anna Wintour"

by Eva Voinigescu
Worn, July 12, 2013

As the most talked about woman in fashion and the Queen of Condé Nast, Wintour holds in her hands the power to turn—whether we like it or not—the tides of fashion. But with great power comes great scrutiny, and Wintour has had more than her fair share. Sometimes, however, the rumours come in the form of gently prodding, oddly flattering cartoons like these by illustrator Lisa Hanawalt, published by The Hairpin a few years ago. “Anna Wintour does not have bowel movements. But she does lay stunning eggs,” reads the text on one hilarious drawing in the series. What Hanawalt imagines happening to those eggs is even better.
 
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Featured artist

Lisa Hanawalt

          



  A Bullett Art & Design interview with Lisa Hanawalt

Updated September 10, 2013


"New York Cartoonist Lisa Hanawalt on her 'Dirty Dumb Eyes'"

by Fiona Dunca
Bullett Media, July 5, 2013

Lisa Hanawalt describes her new comics collection My Dirty Dumb Eyes (Drawn and Quarterly, May 2013) as a “grabbag.” The Bay Area raised, New York based artist has been putting out zines, floppies and web comics for years but My Dirty Dumb Eyes is her debut book book; hardback, perfect bound. The book assembles previously published work—from those zines and floppies but also from imprints like Lucky Peach, Saveur, The New York Times and The Believer—along with over 40 pages of new material. Indeed, the collection comes across as a kind of loot bag: a merry miscellany of candy colored comics, jocular gag strips and charming full-page illustrations starring cultural figures such as Anna Wintour, Mario Batali, Ryan Gosling and Wolverine, a zoo of anthropomorphic animals and lots of sexy sex.

I met with Lisa Hanawalt at her Pencil Factory studio loft in Greenpoint, Brooklyn a couple weeks ago. It was a stunning June mid-afternoon so we decided to do our interview outdoors. We walked down to the East River and settled in an unshaded corner of grass by the waterfront. Lisa had just gotten back from one leg of her book tour. The next stride would take her to San Diego Comic Con and that’s where we started…

Have you gone to the Con before?
Yes, a bunch of times.

What’s the craziest thing you’ve seen at a San Diego Comic Con?
I saw these parents who were walking about with their two sons and they had painted perfect realistic bullet holes in the center of their children’s foreheads; blood pouring out, super realistic. And they just had these smug expressions like, “Yeah, we’re pretty edgy.”

Are you ever felt compelled to dress up?
Every year I want to dress up but I always chicken out. In past years, I shared a booth with Matt Furie and his girlfriend Aiyana Udesen and she would dress up in a Star Trek uniform one day and a nurse costume the next. It was amazing. If I could somehow get a sexy moose costume, I would totally do that.

You draw a lot of mooses (meese?) and horses. Did you ride in your youth?
Yeah, I did. I started when I was eight and I took lessons off and on for a long time. I would quit when I got too scared. You know, I’d have an accident and I’d get scared. I don’t really ride anymore. Although last month, I did go horseback riding in Woodstock. I was on this super old horse and we were just plodding around but it totally reignited my obsession. I’ve had dreams about horses almost every night since.

You must dream vividly. I feel like I read about your dreams on Twitter a lot.
Which is funny because I think that dreams are such bullshit.

What do you mean you think they’re bullshit?
I just think dreams are boring and that they don’t necessarily mean anything. I’m not interested in dream analysis. Dreams have nothing to do with real life.

Are you of the camp who believes that dreams are just recycled mish-mash from the day?
Yeah, sure. If you’re stressed, you’re going to dream a certain way. I’ve heard that if you have dreams about your teeth falling out that means you’re worried about money. I never used to have that dream but I have been lately, ever since I had a slew of dental problems, and indeed I was hemorrhaging money on this one tooth that is still not fixed.

Wow. That’s an amazing literalization of a standard dream symbol. So dreams are bullshit. Moving on. Did you read comics as a kid?
Yeah, I read the Sunday paper. Garfield, The Far Side—those were my favorites. My dad had these comics by B. Kliban. He’s most well known for his cat drawings but he also made these fucked up ‘70s cartoons that I read when I was probably too young to be reading them. That was a big influence.

Were these like sexy ‘70s underground comix?
Some of them were sexy. Some of them have naked people crawling around. They’re grotesquely drawn with a lot of puns, a lot of wordplay and absurdity. Surreal stuff.

Have you always drawn with words and images?
I’ve always paired words and images. I think just from reading comics, I learned to associate art with words. I would draw little comic books when I was young. Like, I drew one about a horse and a donkey that lived together. They were roommates.

Have you always had such a lewd sense of humor?
Pretty much. I mean, I didn’t start out drawing dicks and stuff. I was pretty well-behaved as a kid. But I’ve always been interested in sex. I remember stealing my parent’s copy of The Joy of Sex and looking through it. I just think it’s interesting and funny to think this way.

Do you only see this way when you’re illustrating or does it extend to your everyday life? Like, if you were at a house party and you were meeting a bunch of new people, do take in the scene with “Dirty Dumb Eyes”?
Uhhh… If one of them is wearing a see-through shirt or something, I’ll think that’s funny. I guess I’m drawn to what’s overtly sexual. If two of my friends are dating, I’ll imagine them having sex. I feel like everyone does that though but maybe not everyone admits it.

Maybe. I feel like people are starting to admit to this stuff again, like there’s a renewed discourse about sexuality.
It’s weird how things become more conservative and more liberal in waves. You’d think it would be just more and more liberal, as in a straight line, but it’s not. If you watch movies from the ‘70s and ‘80s, a lot of them are shockingly lewd, like tits everywhere, even if they’re just comedies. Like, I watched Slap Shot recently and I was like whoa this is really out there, really raunchy. I feel like society pulled back for a while but now we’re going forward again, with shows like Girls. We’re becoming more comfortable with overt sexuality again, which I think is a good thing.

Absolutely. And we’re also seeing more individual lead sexuality, like the selfie. People are putting themselves out there. Do you like Miley Cyrus?
I was just thinking about her! I saw her video [We Can’t Stop] last night and I found it strangely upsetting and depressing. Maybe I was just in the wrong mood for it. My boyfriend liked it and was laughing through it but it made me sad. It’s just hard to say how much ownership she has over what she’s doing or whether it’s everyone around her being like, “Now you’re going to be a sexual, mature adult and the way you’re going to show that is by humping a mattress in front of a camera crew all day.” It makes me sad that female pop stars always have to up the ante in terms of how sexual they are whereas male pop stars don’t have to.

What bothers me is that she seems to be appropriating a kind of queer or alternative/liberated looking female sexuality but it’s maybe missing the parts of that that are subversive.
Right. She looks fantastic but it’s all surface. Everything that she’s doing is still for the male gaze.

So this is the first hard book you’ve put out.
Yeah, it’s hard. It was going to be less hard and they decided to make it harder.

I like the plastic cover. It seems like you could take it all sorts of places. One of my favorite pieces in the book is your series on Anna Wintour, which I think is one of the only good things ever written on her.
Thank you. I love her. I love Devil Wears Prada, that’s such a guilty pleasure film. And I loved The September Issue. I’m so fascinated by Anna Wintour.

What about her?
She’s just so… impenetrable. Women are expected to be warm and put others needs before them and women who aren’t like that—women who are extremely successful and who sort of come across as a cold bitch—they fascinate me. I have immense respect for Anna Wintour. She’s amazing. She has so much power.

She absolutely has power.
I love that. She’s such an alien person to me because I’m such a softy. In some ways, she represents what I wish I could do: to conceal all of my humanity and all of my needs and my emotions and just get what I need to get done done.
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Featured artist

Lisa Hanawalt

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My Dirty Dumb Eyes




The National Post on My Dirty Dumb Eyes

Updated June 25, 2013


Graphic Scenes: Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life, My Dirty Dumb Eyes, The Library

National Post, June 21, 2013

Marrying an inspired sense of crude absurdity with an uncommonly lush and colourful drawing style, Lisa Hanawalt’s comics fall somewhere between the marginal doodles that have you suppressing laughter in the back of chemistry and drawing farting butts on Impressionist canvases. The rare mind that can conceive of something as ridiculous as Anna Wintour offering you a dead mouse as a present and evocatively render it, her oblique catalogues of modern experience and left-field comics are the stuff that draws laughs sheerly through being like nothing you’ve quite seen before.

My Dirty Dumb Eyes (Drawn and Quarterly, 120 pp; $22.95), which collects her assorted gag strips, comic movie reviews and longer work, is a perfect introduction, one best read where no one is going to look askance at you for laughing at chimps dressed up Ryan Gosling in Drive. Set side by side, her more narrative work suffers some against the free-form ridiculousness of her diary-like entries, but that has more to do with the latter’s sheer inspiration; Hanawalt is flat-out funny in a way few people, never mind artists, ever manage.
 
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Lisa Hanawalt

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My Dirty Dumb Eyes




  My Dirty Dumb Eyes & Moomin featured in NPR's top 5 summer comics

Updated June 25, 2013


The Funny (Touching, Fascinating) Pages: 5 Comics For Summer

NPR, June 18, 2013

My Dirty Dumb Eyes
by Lisa Hanawalt
Hardcover, 1 v. (unpaged)
Then, of course, there's My Dirty Dumb Eyes, by Lisa Hanawalt, which might qualify as a guilty pleasure if it wasn't so smart. Hanawalt is weird and funny, and has given her imagination and subconscious free rein in this collection of vignettes, jokes and contemporary observations, which showcase drawing styles ranging from surreal and cartoony to frighteningly accurate caricature. Hanawalt's mind is a dangerous place that you'll feel lucky to visit through illustrated movie reviews and musings on popular culture that will — among other things — change the way you think about Martha Stewart, celebrity chefs and Anna Wintour forever. What makes her so fun to read is her willingness to champion the sorts of thoughts most of us barely admit to ourselves — ideas about sex, borderline behavior in movie theaters, and an animal hat fixation that results in several pages that will make you laugh even if you're in a public place at the time. Read this book because it's funny, because it's beautiful, and because it will nourish the inner weirdo you've been keeping under wraps for too long.

...

Moomin: The Complete Tove Jansson Comic Strip
by Tove Jansson
Hardcover, 95 pages
The last must-read comic I'm going to wing your way isn't even a book — it's a whole series of them (the next one comes out in September). Finnish cartoonist Tove Jansson is as famous as Walt Disney in large swaths of Europe, but in this country she's someone most people haven't heard of. Jansson created the creatures known as Moomins, and while she wrote some memorable children's novels about them, she (and later her brother, Lars) also created a quirky, original comic strip masterpiece for European newspapers. Moomin ran from 1954 to 1975 and, at its peak, appeared in newspapers in over 40 countries. The Moomin universe is what you'd get if you took Roald Dahl, Dr. Seuss, Bill Watterson and Charles Schultz, and mixed them together with Finland's cartoonishly long summer days and winter nights. On the outside, your average Moomin resembles a cross between an albino hippopotamus and the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man, but like all timeless characters, Moomins are the vehicles through which Jansson explores everything that's laughable, charming, laudable and suspect about being human. Whether they're exploring the oceans, entertaining ungrateful guests, or trying their hands at being artists or being famous, the Moomin series — like Peanuts — is the sort of thing you can read at age 8 or at 48 and find equally gratifying
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Featured artists

Tove Jansson
Lisa Hanawalt

           Featured products

Moomin: The Complete Tove Jansson Comic Strip, Book One
My Dirty Dumb Eyes




Bitch Magazine highlights Lisa Hanawalt and Rutu Modan

Updated June 5, 2013


"Four Brand New Woman-Created Comics You Should Acquire Immediately"

by Sarah Mirk
Bitch Media, May 31, 2013

Spring has felt like a blockbuster season for great new comics from my favorite artists.

Lots of comics artists debut new work before they hit the road for conventions in the spring—heading to big indie-friendly comics shows like VanCAF, TCAF, and Chicago’s upcoming CAKE before the clustercuss of San Diego ComiCon in July—so May and June are an excellent time to be a comics reader. This is also an excellent time to become a comics reader. Whether you’re looking to pick up your first graphic novel or add new titles to your long list of must-reads, here are four of my favorite new books from female comics artists. Pick ‘em up!

MY DIRTY DUMB EYES – Lisa Hanawalt (Drawn & Quarterly)

For an entire week, I carried My Dirty Dumb Eyes in my bag and forced it into the hands of whatever friends I ran into. “Read these comics about dogs!” I screeched. “I know it’s strange, just read it.” The response was always the same: confusion, exclamation, laughter. Why are Lisa Hanawalt’s bizarre, moderately disturbing drawings so deeply funny? I will never be able to explain the mystery of why her skillfull paintings of cats dangling from helicopters and historic people pooping crack me up, but suffice to say that Hanawalt’s gorgeous renderings resonate with a dark part of my brain, making me burst out laughing at images I’ve never seen before and will never fully comprehend. Plus, the lady knows how to tell a good story. My Dirty Dumb Eyes gathers together comics published around various parts of the web with some new illustrations. Even though I’d already read many of the pieces collected in the book—like her review of The Vow and dispatch from a Toy Fair—it was a joy to read them through again. And then again. And again.

....THE PROPERTY – Rutu Modan (Drawn & Quarterly)

Translated from Hebrew, The Property is a rare story that feels like both honest personal history and gripping fiction. Rutu Modan's story follows an Israeli woman and her Polish-born grandmother as they travel to Poland, attempting to settle some World War II-era family property issues, but really exploring Jewish identity and their own independence from both family and history. Modan is an expert of gesture—she captures complex emotions and feelings with just a few simple lines. It's clear she does her real-life research: the book's final page names the people on whom the drawings are based and even credits a "location finder" in Warsaw. The result of Modan's keen eye and hard work is a deep, complicated story told through pared-down images; it's a fantastic use of comics as a medium. I would strongly advise against beginning this book, as I did, at midnight. You will stay up reading until 3am, until your head is sore and you’ve forgotten where you are.
 
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Featured artists

Rutu Modan
Lisa Hanawalt

           Featured products

The Property
My Dirty Dumb Eyes




  Lisa Hanawalt Interviewed by Los Angeles I'm Yours

Updated June 5, 2013


"Questions With A Visitor: Lisa Hanawalt"

By Kyle Fitzpatrick
Los Angeles I'm Yours, May 30, 2013

Lisa Hanawalt is a Brooklyn based artist who has a bit of a thing for being funny. She’s not a comedian, no, but there is an inherent humor in her work. There’s a dry sharpness to them, these pointed pokes to the ribs that are crafted to make you giggle and smile. She’s recently compiled her work into the book My Dirty Dumb Eyes, a hysterical and at all times finely illustrated tour through the happenings in (and around) her head. This includes everything from honest movie reviews to animal comics to renderings about Anna Wintour’s secrets.

To promote this new release, she’s embarking on a cross country tour of the United States and parts of Canada and, obviously, is stopping into Los Angeles. She’ll be doing a little signing and talk at Skylight Books this Monday, June 3, and we thought since she’s a rad gal and LA is a rad city we should probably have a little chat with her about her visit. Although she hasn’t arrived just yet (She’s likely en route from Oakland to Portland, actually.) we had a quick talk about her thoughts on Los Angeles, a city she actually adores and has quite a history with.

LAIY: What brings you to Los Angeles?
LH: I’m doing an event at Skylight Books! I’m going to show and tell from my new book, My Dirty Dumb Eyes, and then autograph (and make dumb drawings) in peoples’ books.

LAIY: How long are you in town?
LH: Only two nights, unfortunately!

LAIY: What neighborhood are you staying in? What are your thoughts on that part of town?
LH: I’m staying with my friend Jessica Gao in Koreatown, near Hollywood. It’s not the most beautiful part of town but it’s very convenient and the Korean BBQ there is the best I’ve ever had. I’m staying with Jessica because she’s funny as hell and she has terrific shoes.

LAIY: How many times have you visited Los Angeles? What do you think of the city?
LH: I moved there in 2001 to attend UCLA, and lived in West LA (near Sawtelle, basically right under where the 405 crosses the 10) until I moved to Brooklyn in 2009. Eight years!! I love LA and still fantasize about moving back and finding an affordable bungalow in Silverlake (I know, dream on). If the public transportation was better it would be my favorite city.

LAIY: What is the best part of your trip so far?
LH: I’m not there yet, but I’m looking forward to seeing old friends and maybe getting some decent tacos.

LAIY: Could you see yourself living here?
LH: I’m staying in NY for now, but I could definitely see myself moving back, especially if I get the opportunity to work on a TV show as a character designer or writer.

Well, you heard it here: give Lisa a job on a television show so we can recruit her to be a West coaster again! We’re sure that will happen sooner than she thinks and, as noted before, you should swing by and see her at Skylight this Monday if you are around. You can–and should–pick up her book here, too.





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Featured artist

Lisa Hanawalt

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My Dirty Dumb Eyes




Paste Magazine calls Lisa Hanawalt's latest "something kind of awesome"

Updated June 5, 2013


"My Dirty Dumb Eyes by Lisa Hanawalt"

By Hillary Brown
Paste Magazine, May 30, 2013

Lisa Hanawalt’s first major collection makes for an interesting comparison to Tom Gauld’s You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack, with which it shares many similarities. Both works avoid long-form narrative, embracing the comic strip rather than the comic book. Both also have obvious obsessions (Hanawalt’s include horses, Chimeras, hands, movies, and genitals), and both like to take an idea and spiral out from a sensible next step or two into surrealism. But where Gauld’s aesthetic is all restraint, Hanawalt’s visual style has more in common with that of Brecht Evens: she thrives in watercolor and bold hues, often rendering figures with blobs of pigment that either remove or minimize outlines. One drawing spread across two pages features a number of human-animal hybrids (mostly human bodies, animal heads) attempting to capture a giant purple-pink horse with the aid of lassos and helicopters. It doesn’t have a joke or a story to drive it, but it’s a delight to look at.

But unlike some of the more obnoxious anti-narrative work out there, My Dirty Dumb Eyes doesn’t aggravate. Perhaps that’s because Hanawalt mixes her illustrations with movie reviews (her coverage of Drive was all over the Internet), lists, and journalism (a visit to the Toy Fair at the Javits Center in New York). Or perhaps it’s because her id-driven images of people molesting each other with hand mixers or a combination of wildflowers and veiny penises seem to spring from an unfiltered place. She’s not trying to impress anyone; she can’t help but draw these things that her brain chews over.

One longer story, about a moose-human who compulsively carves fingers out of clay while struggling with artistic difficulties and mild depression, ends with one character saying, “It doesn’t matter if you feel good or bad while you make stuff. . . . Stop crying and move your hands!” Parable, comic a clef, or whatever it may be, it seems to hold the key to these pages: draw it, do it, let it flow, and the results will be at least something. Happily, My Dirty Dumb Eyes is something kind of awesome.
 
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Featured artists

Tom Gauld
Lisa Hanawalt

           Featured products

You're All Just Jealous Of My Jetpack
My Dirty Dumb Eyes




  My Dirty Dumb Eyes is "hilarious and sexual and weird and dark"

Updated June 5, 2013


"Dick Pics: Lisa Hanawalt Shows off in My Dirty Dumb Eyes"

by Alison Hallett
The Portland Mercury, May 29, 2013

MY INTRODUCTION to Lisa Hanawalt came in 2010, when the Mercury ran one of her illustrations on our cover: In a piece resembling a weirdly sexy interspecies bar brawl, a cat-headed woman in high heels kicked a dog-headed man in the junk. Since then, Hanawalt has racked up increasingly high-profile illustration gigs from the likes of the New York Times, Vanity Fair, and McSweeney's. Hanawalt's work is hilarious and sexual and weird and dark, yet always kind of cheerful and friendly, too. That range is shown off to great effect in the excellently titled new collection My Dirty Dumb Eyes, just released from Drawn and Quarterly.

The glossy, bright-blue hardcover could pass for a kids' book—there's a golden retriever shooting helicopters out of his eyes! Fun!—but a cursory glance at the book's contents reveals a distinctly adults-only affair: here's a comic titled "Sex Fantasies Inspired by Movies" ("The Hulk is trapped in a room containing nothing except my butt"); here's a tiny drawing of chef Wolfgang Puck pleasuring himself with a piece of pizza; here's a pretty watercolor bouquet of purple flowers and purple penises.

My Dirty Dumb Eyes collects movie and TV reviews, standalone art pieces, and gag strips, like three full pages dedicated to surprisingly detailed portraits of animals wearing silly hats. Buried among the dick jokes are quieter strips based on Hanawalt's own life.

"The stories where people are animals are the most autobiographical," Hanawalt explained in a phone interview. "There's one where She-Moose is making these stupid sculptures, and she's crying in bed, and [a cat-headed man] is consoling her, telling her it doesn't matter whether she feels good or bad when she's creating something... That came directly out of a conversation I had with my boyfriend, who unfortunately has to listen to me moan and groan a lot about what I do."

Hanawalt co-hosts the comedy podcast Baby Geniuses with stand-up Emily Heller, who recently appeared in Portland at the Bridgetown Comedy Fest. But while Hanawalt's work is full of jokes and visual gags, she doesn't see herself trying stand-up comedy any time soon.

"For the most part, being funny through drawing is much easier," she says. "I got good at drawing quite early on, and I quickly realized it was a great way to entertain people around me, and to make my brother laugh, and my friends laugh. It's always felt like a superpower I had. I was a super shy kid, and I was too shy to tell jokes verbally, so drawing was a way to get through that."

The final two pieces in My Dirty Dumb Eyes contain subjects Hanawalt says she's been drawing for years: horses and car crashes. In the first piece, colored in soft reds and greens, a cat and a horse bicker as they drive down the freeway (the cat's the driver; the horse is backseat driving like an asshole). The final piece is a beautiful, two-page spread of a car crash, red and green cars crumpled together, spilling intestines from under their hoods. The cat and horse story is the newest piece in the book, and the car crash illustration is the oldest; but like the rest of this great collection, they fit together seamlessly, a talented artist's long-time fixations paying off big.
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Featured artist

Lisa Hanawalt

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My Dirty Dumb Eyes




Lia Hanawalt and Gilbert Hernandez's latest reviewed in the Chicago Tribune

Updated June 5, 2013


"Lisa Hanawalt's visions: Michael Robbins reviews 'My Dirty Dumb Eyes' and Gilbert Hernandez's latest"

By Michael Robbins
Chicago Tribune, May 25, 2013

I totally hate Lisa Hanawalt. I hate anyone who's funnier than I am and can draw Anna Wintour holding a dead rat in her teeth. Gathering one-page gags (dinosaur Jeff Goldblum) and more thoughtful pieces that answer questions like "What if a high-heeled moose made fingers out of clay?" the Brooklyn cartoonist's debut collection is the most exciting and inventive comics art to appear since the ancient Egyptians invented hieroglyphics. People are always saying that something made them LOL, but did it really? "My Dirty Dumb Eyes" did. Only Kate Beaton's "Hark! A Vagrant" (2011), among recent comics, even approaches the hilarity of Hanawalt's most inspired bits.

Some of these pieces appeared previously in Vanity Fair, The New York Times Book Review and other publications, which is good, because Hanawalt is clearly unfit for ordinary employment. She puts the N in NSFW. I want to describe to you the watercolor of flowers and red, erect penises, but I have no English. Or the drawing of a sex fantasy inspired by the film "Point Break" — can I say "labia" in this paper?

But it's the illustrated movie reviews that I love the most. Hanawalt, a professed "ape hater," goes to see "Rise of the Planet of the Apes" with her "monkey-loving boyfriend" and takes notes: "This audience is so pro-ape from the start"; "The boss character, Jacobs, just shouted, 'I run a business, not a petting zoo!' Hey, petting zoos are totally a business"; "Jacobs has all the best lines. 'You know everything about the human brain, except how it works.' That's such a burn to a scientist. How brains work is 99% of what there is to know about brains!"

Ads by Google

The review of "War Horse" (she's "bummed" that it "isn't a horse version of 'Rise of the Planet of the Apes'") is even better, since Hanawalt loves to draw horses so much that it's a little creepy. This review makes me want to go see a movie with Lisa Hanawalt, although not necessarily one that I care about: "The woman sitting in front of me keeps falling asleep and I want to yell 'Hey Snore Horse!' so bad I'm in physical pain."

The death of one of the horses in "War Horse" gives Hanawalt "feelings diarrhea," and that's what I have after reading her book. My feelings are flowing out of me, and they are feelings of "OK, I love this book so much I want to give it to people I hate, like Bashar al-Assad." It's hard to describe the appeal of the art — Hanawalt's mastered several styles, including ones I call "deliberately awkward and stiff art-school portfolio" and "smooth psychedelic." She seems to have spent a lot of time staring at Raymond Pettibon's record covers. One story is an excuse for her to draw a gorgeous horse on an airplane with eggs and birds gushing from its eyes. Come to think of it, she could make some bank designing posters for metal bands. Almost every page needs to be lingered over. And we should not discount the larger philosophical import of "My Dirty Dumb Eyes," which teaches us that if dogs could shoot tiny dog-piloted helicopters out of their eyes, the world would be a better place.

•••

Gilbert Hernandez and his brother Jaime have been lighting up critics' eyes with "Love and Rockets" since 1981. While Jamie concentrated on disaffected punks living in a Hispanic suburb of L.A., Gilbert's stories, set in a fictional Latin American town called Palomar, drifted in bleached squares under Gabriel García Márquez's spell — a dreamlike cauldron of brujas and crucifixes and turmoil. In his stand-alone solo works like "Chance in Hell" (2007) and "Speak of the Devil" (2008), Gilbert squirmed into the seamy stuff of B-movies and uneasy David-Lynchian non sequitur: orphans in junkyards, devil-masked peeping toms, nuns who say things like, "If the Babykiller hears about the quicksand pit, he'll have no trouble getting rid of the bodies now. But for him, part of the fun is when the body is found."

So it's something of a surprise to find Hernandez mining "Peanuts" and "Archie" for the new "Marble Season," a quasi-autobiographical account of a kid named Huey and his friends growing up in a California suburb. Huey is devoted to comic books and his older brother, and the book's episodic narrative is so low-key and sunny that it seems slight. Hernandez has a charming grasp of childhood's alien concerns. He remembers the sweet earnestness with which children devote themselves to activities like collecting cheap Martian trading cards or teaching their younger brothers how to understand comic books. But there's nothing at stake in Huey's story besides the overly familiar drama of bullies and girls, the disasters of accidentally trashed comic collections and broken action figures. Pleasant enough stuff, but minor. You get the sense that Hernandez isn't playing to his strengths.

Gilbert has always been a less nuanced artist than his brother Jaime — his characters have a tendency to stand with their arms stiffly at their sides like zombies — but he brings a quiet mastery to his spare panels, with their quick-stroked skies and exaggerated facial expressions. You can see his influence in the work of younger cartoonists like Jeff Smith and Kevin Huizenga. The best panels here involve the registration of slight changes — a baseball bat being smashed against the ground, two children's agitated reaction to another kid's claim that his name is Satan ("He shouldn't joke like that; he shouldn't —"; "I - I know, what if he had a heart attack instantly after he said that?!"). But often the material doesn't give Hernandez much to work with, and people just stand around or walk by, with their arms at their sides.

Like "Peanuts" and "Calvin and Hobbes," "Marble Season" hymns unstructured childhood days, but it could use more structure.
 
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Featured artists

Gilbert Hernandez
Lisa Hanawalt

           Featured products

Marble Season
My Dirty Dumb Eyes




  Lisa Hanawalt interviewed by Comic Book Resources

Updated June 5, 2013


"Hanawalt Collects 'My Dirty Dumb Eyes'"

By Alex Dueben
Comic Book Resources, May 24th, 2013

Lisa Hanawalt has made an impression reputation for herself as a cartoonist and illustrator over the past few years. She won the Ignatz Award for Outstanding Mini-Comic in 2009 for "Stay Away From Other People" and the Ignatz Award for Best Comic the following year for "I Want You" #1. She's illustrated numerous books including Kristen Schaal's "The Sexy Book of Sexy Sex," "Farts Around the World: A Spotter's Guide" and the children's book "Benny's Brigade." She was a member of the former artists collective known as Pizza Island and is co-host of the weekly podcast Baby Geniuses.

"My Dirty Dumb Eyes" collects Hanawalt's comic books and various other publications. She has her own unique take on the world, whether reviewing movies, telling comic stories of moose and cats and horses, playing with the indicia of the book or just offering advice for living with a significant other, Hanawalt shows herself to be an original voice in comics. Her book was releasedby Drawn and Quarterly at Toronto Comic Arts Festival last weekend and Hanawalt spoke with CBR News about the collection before journeying to Canada.

CBR News: Lisa, to start, will you introduce yourself and talk a little about your background?

Lisa Hanawalt: Hello, I'm Lisa! I grew up in the Bay Area, my parents are biologists at Stanford University and my older brother is a film director/editor. My family's liberal and artsy and we like to make terrible puns.

I studied art at UCLA (mostly painting, photography and ceramics). I moved to Brooklyn four years ago because I figured it was time to live somewhere other than California and I was seduced by the NY comics scene. I also met my boyfriend Adam here and wanted to live in the same city as him....
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Featured artist

Lisa Hanawalt

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My Dirty Dumb Eyes




The Daily Californian on My Dirty Dumb Eyes

Updated June 5, 2013


"‘My Dirty Dumb Eyes’ puts a childlike spin on adult humor"

By Natalie Reyes
The Daily Californian, May 23, 2013

Lisa Hanawalt’s got a downright dirty sense of humor. Her new book, “My Dirty Dumb Eyes,” delves into nether regions, the therapy sessions of anthropomorphic figures and a Manhattan Toy Fair “full of serious adults in business suits with corporate accounts.” The book, which is a collection of illustrations and cartoons, features Hanawalt’s whimsical drawing style. It is as if a David Shrigley show was condensed into a blue hardcover book and rainbows were generously applied to it (Shrigley works largely in black and white).

If Hanawalt were to draw an illustration to represent her book, it might be an image of her own head bursting with anthropomorphic animals in bikinis, Ryan Gosling chewing on 246 toothpicks, Anna Wintour riding an ostrich, the entire cast of “The Bachelor” with thousands of clay finger statues — “visual puns, sort of” — and maybe a million plastic horses thrown in for good measure.

“My Dirty Dumb Eyes” blurs the line between childlike and adult humor. Despite being an illustrated book, this is not a book you’d share with your kid brother — unless your kid brother is into dick lizards and erect penises rising among swaying flowers, an illustrative pun on fertilization. This is an adult book for adults who never really grew up and perhaps need some help with transitioning. There’s heaps of Hanawalt’s help, thankfully.

For instance, Hanawalt’s “Tips for Living With a Significant Other” addresses the end of romance — “Prepare for the statistical likelihood of breaking up by labeling your possessions ahead of time” — with humor rather than moroseness. The accompanying illustration is of a table with items — dishes, books, cup — bearing “his” and “mine” sticky notes.

Hanawalt does a decent job of convincing us of her naivety, but we are reminded, as with the sixth illustration in “Tips for Living,” that her art is tongue-in-cheek — she is not as innocent as her drawings suggest. “Learn to communicate openly and don’t let bad feelings fester,” is damn good advice, but the accompanying illustration — of a woman stabbing at an angry-faced breakfast plate while her partner’s breakfast plate resembles a frowny face — is charming and elicits a giggle.

“My Dirty Dumb Eyes” is an inside joke that most any pop culturally-aware person can understand. This is a book for television watchers and moviegoers, for toy lovers and equine enthusiasts, for the artsy-fartsy and the artsy-farty; Hanawalt is a perfect scatological specimen, her humor bodily and strange. “The soldiers’ horses are marching against the backdrop of a firey sunset and one of them is pooping! I see the silhouettes of poops!” Hanawalt writes in her review of Steven Spielberg’s “War Horse.” Sure enough, her illustration depicts the magnificent fecal silhouettes. She finishes her movie review with four out of five horseshoes but others with kisses (“The Vow”), apes (“Rise of the Planet of the Apes”) or goslings (“Drive”).

There’s a lot to love in “My Dirty Dumb Eyes,” and there are some things that are more macabre and disturbing. Some of Hanawalt’s art inspires awe and fascination rather than laughter — particularly her anthropomorphic animals. One comic, “Control,” shows a cat and horse driving a car. Thanks to the cat’s self-assured reckless driving, an accident transpires. The resulting pileup features the distorted intestinal — literally intestinal — remains of the wrecked vehicles. “Extra Egg Room,” another anthropomorphic comic, is similarly gruesome — dozens of birds lay their offspring inside the shell of a horse bound for the sky.

If it doesn’t make much sense, maybe you’re not in on the joke. We get the feeling Hanawalt is laughing maniacally in her Brooklyn home, making thousands of clay fingers and drawing naked butts with abandon.
 
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Featured artist

Lisa Hanawalt

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My Dirty Dumb Eyes




  Cult Montreal on My Dirty Dumb Eyes

Updated June 4, 2013


"This New D&Q Book Will Make You LOL"

by Emily Raine
Cult Montreal, May 11, 2013

Lisa Hanawalt may not be a household name yet, but give it time. She’s provided “op-art” comic editorials for virtually every media outlet of note, from McSweeney’s to Vice to the New York Times, as well as illustrating several children’s books, accumulating a slew of awards and, with Michael Kupperman, providing the artwork for Kristen Schaal and Rich Blomquist’s sex-book parody The Sexy Book of Sexy Sex.

Hanawalt has a gift for composing tight, funny one-panel narratives that somehow tap into the zeitgeist and beg to be memes — see her James Beard-award winning “Secret Lives of Chefs” series for compelling proof. She somehow manages the near-impossible: rendering caca-peepee-butt humour, frank sexuality and silliness in a way that is totally smart and strangely beautiful.

From her review of romantic schlockfest ‘The Vow’: “On the way home from the theatre I saw a rat who found a churro and it was more romantic than anything in the entire movie.”

In My Dirty Dumb Eyes, a recent collection published by Drawn & Quarterly, the NY-based artist treats fans to a cross-section of her work so far. The brightly coloured volume includes one-off single panel jokes, but there are also several lengthy film responses, including a great take on Drive (“I liked [Ryan Gosling] in The Notebook, Half Nelson, Lars and the Real Girland Google Image Search”), diary-like chronicles of her domestic life in which she is drawn as a moose and her partner a cat, plus what is apparently a post-wedding thank you letter to everyone who contributed to her gift registry showing them using various household appliances they received as sex toys.
Hanawalt also delivers a few absurdist fashion stories, such as galleries of meticulously rendered wild animals in surrealist hats (a nod to Elsa Schiaparelli?) and “Rumours I’ve Heard About Anna Wintour,” including that “she’s a closeted chubby chaser,” has her assistants incubate the ornate ostrich eggs she lays instead of pooping and secretly shops at Forever 21.

In short, Lisa Hanawalt is the shit. She answered a few questions about her work via email.

Emily Raine: How did you get into the “op-art” business?

Lisa Hanawalt: Totally accidental, I think it just conforms to the way I think of ideas for drawings and comics really well!

ER: What’s the appeal of using animals (often in human clothes) to tell stories in your pictures?

LH: I love animals and think about them all the time, especially horses, so they are always the most interesting and fun thing for me to draw. They have such distinct personalities, it feels normal to draw them as people. You’d think I’d be a vegan, but nope!

ER: I dig the self-deprecating title, especially since I think the dirtiness and dumbness is what’s so appealing about your work. Would you describe yourself as a self-hating artist?

LH: It’s pretty cliché now, but yeah I am pretty self-loathing. It’s a good way to balance out how narcissistic and selfish I have to be to do what I do!

ER: I see sort of two main styles in your images: strong-thickly outlined bold images, and the softer, more amorphous watercolours. What factors into your decision to draw a picture in one or the other style?

LH: I like switching back and forth but lately I’m leaning towards working with a looser style. And it depends on the subject matter and what will subvert expectations the most – for a piece about something traditionally pretty, like a wedding, I’m going to use a rough/ugly approach. And for something really silly, like animals in hats, I think it’s more funny if I draw it with a hyper-realistic style.

ER: What led you to start doing the comic film reviews?

LH: I was watching Transformers 3 with my brother and it was such an intense, entertaining-yet-extremely-unpleasant experience that I thought at the very least I should make a funny blog entry about it. My friends immediately responded to it and demanded that I do more movie reviews, so I complied!

ER: Are you going to do more chef profiles? Those are so awesome.

LH: I don’t have any specific plans, but the food industry is so interesting to me I have no doubt I’ll make more work about it!
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Lisa Hanawalt

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My Dirty Dumb Eyes




The L Magazine Interviews Lisa Hanawalt

Updated June 4, 2013


Interview: Greenpoint Comics Artist Lisa Hanawalt and the View From My Dirty Dumb Eyes

By Jeff Klingman
The L Magazine, May 20, 2013

In the comics of Greenpoint artist Lisa Hanawalt, familiar things get very odd, very fast. The award-winning artist, who's been published in The New York Times, The Believer, VICE, and Vanity Fair (to name a few) draws straight from her own dark Id, yet manages to turn subjects that could be icky into whimsical nonsense that can't help but confuse and delight. In her disturbingly detailed pages, the secret lives of dogs and celebrity chefs are revealed. Dirty daydreams involve miniaturizing the surfing bank robbers from Point Break. Anna Wintour gives birth to fanciful birds. If you sex a lady just right, she might turn into a velociraptor.

Two years in the making, her new book My Dumb Dirty Eyes is released by indie comics powerhouse Drawn & Quarterly next Monday. There's a book launch for it at 7PM tonight at the Power House Arena in DUMBO. Ahead of all this excitement, we talked to Hanawalt about her book, her illustration career, her dirty mind, and the fetish communities just hankering for new drawings of sexy lizard ladies....
 
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Lisa Hanawalt

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My Dirty Dumb Eyes




  Hazlitt interviews Lisa Hanawalt

Updated June 4, 2013


"Lisa Hanawalt is Probably Thinking About Horses or Dogs"

By Chris Randle
Hazlitt, May 16, 2013

The Brooklyn–based cartoonist, illustrator and podcast host speaks to Hazlitt about learning to talk to comedians, Channing Tatum’s abs, and why she may or may not be a furry.

Lisa Hanawalt is not a comedian, in the traditional sense of the word, but she draws like a versatile one: idiosyncratic cultural observation, a surrealist’s sense of humour, inventively filthy. The two issues of her comic I Want You abounded with anthropomorphic animals, those elemental cartooning familiars, wearing unnervingly detailed human bodies. In Hanawalt’s contribution to the pornographic anthology Thickness, the old teacher-student scenario plays out in front of an entire class. “Oh god, her tits! Tiiiiiiiiits…And that ASS,” ponders the avian instructor, who is lusting after a girl with a worm for a head, invertebrates writhing through her cleavage.

That particular nightmare/fantasy does not appear in My Dirty Dumb Eyes, the new Drawn & Quarterly collection of Hanawalt’s work, but you will find Prince as a dove, an artistically frustrated moose lady, and many, many monkeys. The Brooklyn cartoonist has lent expressive colours to more and more illustration gigs lately, and reading pieces like “Rumours I’ve Heard About Anna Wintour” or “Sex Fantasies Inspired By Movies” (“The Hulk is trapped in a room containing nothing but my butt”), it’s only sharpened her jokes elsewhere. We spoke at last weekend’s Toronto Comic Arts Festival, after a coincidental burger-related introduction the night before....

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Lisa Hanawalt chats with Sadie Magazine

Updated June 4, 2013


"Cookies, Collecting, and Poop—A Chat with Lisa Hanawalt"

Written by Kelly McClure

Sadie Magazine

Lisa Hanawalt is a Brooklyn-based artist whose first major book, My Dirty Dumb Eyes, comes out on Drawn & Quarterly in May. Her work has appeared in The Hairpin, Vanity Fair, The Believer, and she illustrated a book about farts once. I thought it would be a good idea to meet Lisa for coffee at Cookie Road in Greenpoint to talk about her life, and to also make sure and point out that I knew a lot about her—even prior to our interview, because I’d been stalking her on Twitter and Instagram for a month.

Kelly: So, you’re going on a book tour and I can’t imagine what that’s like.

Lisa: Me neither! I’ve done conventions a lot, and for my previous job I used to have to go to conventions to sell camera equipment, so I’ve kind of had a little bit of training in how to engage people and sell things to them even though I’m super shy.

Kelly: The funny thing about all that though is that, OK, so you’re sitting at a table, and you see someone walking towards you, and then there’s maybe that awkwardness where you have to sit there and stare at them, or have some sort of smile, until they bridge the distance from where they were to where you are.

Lisa: That’s the most awkward part, where someone’s coming towards you but you’re too far apart to start talking, but you have to acknowledge them in some way. I probably come across as a little aloof because I just don’t know what to do. What’s even weirder is when they’re nervous to meet me, because I’m like “ME! You’re nervous to meet ME?” There was this one girl who came up to me during Comic-Con and she had this stack of books, and she was so nervous that the books started to topple to the floor. I just started asking her questions about herself.

Kelly: Well, the level of social anxiety is so severe that sometimes it’s nerve-racking just to leave the house.

Lisa: I completely relate to that. Just interacting with a cashier at a bodega is such an awkward, intense experience for me.

Kelly: This book is kind of your first major solo thing. How did you get hooked up with Drawn & Quarterly as the publisher?

Lisa: My agent, and I sent them a proposal and they said yes. Thankfully. We had sent proposals to a few other places too, but people kept wanting to change the book, or add things. One place was like “Can you do a chapter on cocktails? Or nightlife?” One company wanted me to do an entire book about Ryan Gosling, but I don’t want something that people will just pick up at the checkout aisle and then it’s tiresome after one week. Drawn & Quarterly were the first to say that they just wanted the book to be my vision.

Kelly: You’ve drawn Ryan Gosling a few times, and you sell some prints of those drawings on your Etsy shop. If Gosling ordered one, would you include a little note to him, or would you be like “That’s cool, whatever?”

Lisa: Oh, I would definitely write to him. I don’t know what I’d say. I’d probably try to make a drawing for him or something. I’m such an ass-kisser. I’d totally suck up to him.

Kelly: Do you collect anything? Do you have any weird collections? And this question comes from lurking and seeing a picture you had posted of your desk, and it looked like you had a lot of cool stuff. I always love seeing pictures of people’s workspaces, and apartment interiors in general.

Lisa: I used to be a big time collector of everything I was into. I collected plastic horses, and Legos, and I got really into the Beatles at one point so I collected Beatles stuff. If you go to my childhood bedroom you can see all these different obsessions. And now I’m trying to pair down and own less stuff, so I don’t collect many things, but I definitely have that need to hunt for things. Maybe someday when I have more space I’ll get back into it. Also I feel like when I was more into collecting I was a lonelier person. I was single for like six or seven years, living in LA, and I just had crazy crap around me all the time. And now I live with my boyfriend, and a dog, so stuff is less important to me than it used to be.

Kelly: So you have a dog, and this is something I’ve thought about more than twice (not specific to your dog, but in general)—I’m wondering if your dog suddenly turned into a human, and made its way out into the general public, would you be able to pick it out in a crowd?

Lisa: Would she have human intelligence? Or would she be just as smart as she is now? If she were as smart as she is now I’d be able to pick her out because she’d be like “Durrrrr.” She’d be like out in the middle of the street taking a crap. If she had human intelligence I think she’d be like me. I know it’s cliché to say that people resemble their pets, but me and my dog are really similar.

Kelly: Would you describe yourself as an introvert or an extrovert?

Lisa: I recently decided that I don’t believe in that binary. I think people can be more introverted versus extroverted, and vice versa, but I don’t think you’re one way or the other. I’m the kind of person where if I go into a social situation, like a party or something, I do feel like I’m getting into a cold swimming pool and it takes me a while to warm up, but then after that I love to talk to everybody and am like a social butterfly. I think it’s just what you’re used to, and what you like. Generally I do like to spend a lot of time alone, and I do tend to feel exhausted if I’ve been spending a ton of time around other people, so I guess I lean more towards introvert, but yeah. I’m also a little bit of a ham inside.

Kelly: When you’re drawing, do you ever have instances where you have an idea in your head, but it’s difficult to fully translate that out into the image that you’re drawing?

Lisa: That’s the hardest part because you’ll have this perfect picture in your head and think, “I know exactly what this is supposed to look like,” but you just know that the second you start drawing it’s gonna change. I’ve just learned to not worry about. You have to sort of just start drawing to get the bad stuff out of the way, and hone it into something even better than what was originally in your head. That can really paralyze me if I think about it too much.

Kelly: Your captions for the things you draw are often just as funny as the drawings themselves. Do you have a background as a writer?

Lisa: I don’t, but I’ve always written a lot. I used to keep a LiveJournal. [laughs]. I got used to writing about my life every day, and I wrote about it in the funniest way possible, and I think that was good practice in translating real life stuff into funny stories. I’m still not the best writer, and I always think I should write more, but it is important to me that the writing be just as good as the drawings in my work.

Kelly: I saw on your blog that you hate drawing shelves and grocery store aisles. Is that because they’re particularly hard to do, or because you just generally hate it?

Lisa: Anything that is very geometrical, or receding into the background in a way that requires proper perspective, I just hate. I just get so bored with it. And it’s difficult to draw loosely and get it right. Where as if I’m drawing an animal, I can draw the weirdest version of a dog, and you still know it’s a dog, but with shelving if I do it in a loose way it just looks lazy.

Kelly: I listened to a podcast called Butt Talk that you were on and you mentioned that you would prefer if people never knew that you pooped, ever, and I can really relate to that. I guess this isn’t even a question, but picture Ryan Gosling or Angelina Jolie pooping. Like, just picture it.

Lisa: I think about Obama pooping all the time. I think about it at least a couple times a week. It’s amazing to me that he poops.

Kelly: There’s an app for everything and a thing for everything, there should be a thing in public restrooms where there are just noise buttons on the wall. So you can sit there and hit noise buttons while you poop.

Lisa: Like in Japan! They do everything better there. My favorite is when I’m in a restaurant or a bar and they have music playing in the bathroom, because some places do that. That’s the best!
 
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  Slate calls My Dirty Dumb Eyes "The weirdest, funniest comic of the year"

Updated June 4, 2013


"Lisa Hanawalt’s Dirty Dumb Ideas: The weirdest, funniest comic of the year."

By Dan Kois
Slate Magazine, May 3, 2013

Perhaps you recall Lisa Hanawalt’s illustrated review of War Horse from the Hairpin. Perhaps you saw her “Secret Lives of Chefs” in Lucky Peach and were as pleasantly surprised as us when it was nominated for a James Beard Award. Maybe you’ve been reading Lisa Hanawalt’s work since her deeply unsettling self-published comic I Want You in 2009. Or maybe you have never heard of her but are just interested in seeing Jeff Goldblum drawn as a dinosaur.

Well, no matter which of those people you are, you can be glad that Lisa Hanawalt’s first book is out this month. It’s called My Dirty Dumb Eyes and it is exactly as weird, obscene, hilarious, and gross as you might expect. It is awash in penises, butts, poop, and pudenda. It features talking anthropomorphic horses and birds that fart out of the tops of their heads. It is also absurdly smart and sharp. Hanawalt thinks a lot about movies, animals, and relationships, and her work already demonstrates she’s a talented artist, a comic savant, and an enterprising reporter with endless curiosity. The book is already getting rave reviews, so let us add to them by saying: Lisa Hanawalt is completely screwed up, and we’re very proud to have her illustrating the May issue of the Slate Book Review.
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Newsarama reviews My Dirty Dumb Eyes

Updated June 4, 2013


"My Dirty Dumb Eyes Review"

by Zack Kotzer
May 15, 2013

‘Rama Rating: 8 out of 10

If you were wondering if Lisa Hanawalt likes animals, My Dirty Dumb Eyes is a strong argument towards: yes Lisa Hanawalt probably likes animals a lot. Her illustrated review for War Horse regales her efforts to drag her boyfriend’s family to the equine epic. There are two separate chapters about animals in hats. The book is infested with a barnyard of anthropomorphic buddies, warm blooded and cold. She even drew me a goofy horse when I just asked her to sign the book.

Hanawalt also enjoys making lists, which are very popular these days too, but if I had my say every list would be made by her. My Dirty Dumb Eyes is a book with devices that sync well with modern readership habits, without being as banal or annoying as Urban Outfitters' register-side library or BuzzFeed’s daily laziness.

I get the feeling Hanawalt is just going to draw what she feels like, and while one segment deals with artistic struggle, you can detect a comfort in what executing she likes. And she likes drawing animals, visual lists, visual lists about animals, notes about film, notes about films about animals, and sometimes, comics, which are consistently absurd but also jarringly earnest. I wouldn’t mind at all if she kept doing that, all of that, because I think it’s all really excellent.

Hanawalt’s first published anthology isn’t a personal journal as much as a whimsical idea catalogue. You can pretty much track her roaming interests, which drift from the absurd details of intimacy and relationships to automotive accidents to what I’m going to guess are evenings in with the Food Network. I can’t say with utmost certainty, but I think just under half of the book is reprinted web material, though having her visual film essays and fear and loathing at a toy fair from The Hairpin on your bookshelf is by no means a sin.

The collected classics are as funny on paper as they were online, but the new material is the most interesting, vantages of a more personal side we haven’t had much of a glimpse into. A lot of the new material is about casual anxiety. A lot of the new material is about sex. One of the larger chapters is about a young moose hanging around the apartment, frustrated with her developing sculpture series. As much as these moments can strike sore parts of your human heart, Hanawalt is a masterful humorist, and she can cozy familiar woes with big smiling fun seamlessly.

Another reason Hanawalt’s animal obsession is so easy to watch is she’s also amazing at drawing them. Her art is consistently good throughout, but it’s still fascinating how many variants within there is, from the bleeding painted, rough handed to utmost primp and intricately designed. Her anthropomorphic anthropology is reminiscent of Matt Furies’ stoned antics, but with the facetiousness trimmed out. Underneath the Hanawalt’s blanketing animal farm goofiness is strong sentimentality for humans.

"I’m a sucker for ugly animals in costumes," she says, referring to outfitted spiders figurines spotted at a toy show. You don’t say, Lisa. Her animals are often drawn in vivid detail; human faces are comically fleshed out, wide-eyed and MAD Magazine standard.

Actually, now that I think about it, "grown up MAD Magazine" is a good description for this book. It’s full of left field cinema goofs and likely the epitome of body humor, the highest class of fart jokes. And like a MAD Magazine, the jokes are stuffed into this turkey. No Aragones border-fillers, but a parade of jokes, with floats and clowns and streamers and everything. When it breaks, it breaks for lush animal tableaus or off-kilter Jurassic Park fan art.

My Dirty Dumb Eyes may not be a cohesive package, its mind scattered all over and its with its arms stretched out. But My Dirty Dumb Eyes is funny — oh my God, is it funny. Oh my God is Lisa Hanawalt good at this thing she does. Whatever this thing is.
 
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  Lisa Hanawalt signs at Pegasus Books, gets talked up by Patton Oswalt

Updated May 2, 2013


Pegasus Book Store, 30 April 2013

Lisa Hanawalt will discuss and sign copies of her newly released book, My Dirty Dumb Eyes. Hanawalt's comics and illustrations have appeared in The New York Times, New York magazine, The Hairpin, McSweeney’s, Chronicle Books, and Vanity Fair.

"For years I've encountered Lisa Hanawalt's comics and illustrations piecemeal -- in various magazines and periodicals. They're always a pleasant jolt. Now, they've been assembled into one thick, blazing bludgeon. I envy you getting walloped by them all for the first time. This is a Hanawalt assault. Succumb."–Patton Oswalt

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Lisa Hanawalt one of Print's new artists 2013

Updated May 2, 2013


From "Print’s 2013 New Visual Artists: Part 2"

Jane Lerner
Print Mag, 19 April 2013

(...)Age: 29
Title: Illustrator
From: Palo Alto, CA
Lives In: Brooklyn

“I do everything from children’s-book illustrations to weird comics to illustrated movie reviews,” says Lisa Hanawalt. More than anything, though, the Brooklyn-based artist is a gifted comedian. “I’ve always surrounded myself with comedians and class clowns,” she says.” My favorite artists and cartoonists are the funniest and dirtiest ones.” Art directors at magazines like Saveur, Glamour, and Bloomberg Businessweek know that she can make even the most mundane topic interesting and amusing. (It’s a rare recipe for vegetable soup that depicts the artist skating around on discarded onion skins.) At the same time, she is beloved in the underground comic-book scene, with several self-published titles and a big-deal collection coming out this year from Drawn & Quarterly, My Dirty Dumb Eyes.

Hanawalt’s drawings are profane and often confounding—one comic is called Sell Your Boobs, and many of her characters are gawky mammal-human hybrids—yet they remain exceedingly appealing and richly realized. As Christopher Silas Neal, her studio mate at Brooklyn’s Pencil Factory, says, “I’ve had the pleasure of glancing over her shoulder as she inks portrayals of animal sex, helicopter genitalia, and Paul Ryan homoerotica. But she’s more than a mere shock-jock comic.”

Visually, it’s as if R. Crumb took a trip to Busytown, brought along some bawdy old Playboy cartoons and a few episodes of Tim and Eric, and added a good dose of self-reflection. “I’m horrified by how gross bodies are,” Hanawalt says. “Coming back to that subject matter again and again in my work has just been my way of coping with that horror—there’s real pathos there.”

Like a stand-up performer, she mines her own life and pop culture for material, keeping lists of ideas and jokes on her computer, iPhone, and in sketchbooks. “I’m interested in comedy writing,” she says—a hint that the next stage of her career might go completely off the page.

 
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  BuzzFeed: Lisa Hanawalt an internet expert

Updated May 1, 2013


"10 Insane Painters Who Clearly Spend Too Much Time On The Internet"

Kevin Tang
BuzzFeed, 15 April 2013


(...) Animal hat lookbook. You kinda just know Lisa Hanawalt can obliterate you in a brisk match of internetting. (...)
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Publishers Weekly on My Dirty Dumb Eyes: "Irresistible"

Updated May 1, 2013


Publishers Weekly, 17 April 2013

Imagine a grown-up Richard Scarry turned absurdist social commentator, and a world where dogs sit in houses made of fish. Hanawalt’s humor comics, which previously appeared in publications like Vanity Fair and the New York Times Book Review, are collected here for the first time. The disparate subject matter allows her to showcase her different styles: scantily clad animal-people in bright colors and action-packed scenes of chaos segue into painterly images of Anna Wintour riding an ostrich or detailed illustrations of animals in strange hats. While there’s no shying away from poop or unsatisfying sexual positions (“The Leave-In Conditioner”), the collection also allows Hanwalt’s verbal humor to shine in a series of illustrated movie and television reviews (“I just wrote ‘monkeys are horrible’ in my notebook,” she writes of the Planet of the Apes remake. “But I’m hunching over it so nobody can see”). Among the funniest pieces is an illustrated diary of her joyful and childlike trip to the serious industry Toy Fair. In between the overtly humorous pieces, there are more enigmatic stories featuring animal people in therapy sessions or sculpting fingers. Even when the humor flags, the gorgeous illustrations are irresistible.
 
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  Lisa Hanawalt shares her favourite childhood books with Brooklyn Magazine

Updated May 1, 2013


From "Our Favorite Writers Share Their Favorite Childhood Books"

Kristin Iversen
Brooklyn Magazine, 17 April 2013

My older brother and I were obsessed with Cream of Creature from the School Cafeteria when we were little. The story is about a school lunch that gains sentience and won't stop growing and terrorizing the kids—it's super disgusting and the drawings are hilarious. And I won't completely spoil the ending, but I always loved that the hero of the story is a fat dorky kid.
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The A.V. Club praises My Dirty Dumb Eyes and You're All Just Jealous Of My Jetpack

Updated April 15, 2013


From "New comics releases include alternate-history fantasy-horror and a colorful foodie memoir"

Noel Murray
A.V. Club Comics Panel

April 9, 2013


(...) You’re All Just Jealous Of My Jetpack (D&Q) collects some of the comic strips that Gauld has drawn for The Guardian’s book review section, which means that most of them have a literary bent, riffing on famous authors and genre conventions. Gauld imagines a Brontë sisters videogame, with Charlotte racing across the moor toward an angry, cane-wielding man; and he draws some of the characters left out of Kenneth Grahame’s The Wind In The Willows, such as Prawny, Madame Aubergine, and Viscount Stout. He re-conceives Charles Dickens as Batman (complete with Dickensmobile) and cites “Mary’s Undersea Adventure” and “Space Jesus” as some of the apocryphal Bible stories. The jokes in You’re All Just Jealous Of My Jetpack are quick one-pagers, dispatched in just a few panels, but they’re rooted in a love of the human side of books: the real people who write them and the fictional constructs who occupy them. That Gauld is able to get so much of that across with so little is like the most disarming, confounding magic trick. (...)

Unlike Gauld and Martin, Lisa Hanawalt mixes her one-off gags with multi-page humor stories, more in the mode of Michael Kupperman in terms of taking an approach that mixes illustrated text pieces, short strips, sketches, and sprawling sagas. Kupperman provides an approving pull-quote to the back of Hanawalt’s My Dirty Dumb Eyes (D&Q), joined by Patton Oswalt, Julie Klausner, and Kristen Schaal. Hanawalt’s comic style is all her own, though, mixing surrealism, raw sex, cute critters, pop culture, and her own first-person reportage and movie reviews. In short form, Hanawalt ponders how the creatures in Avatar poop (out of their mouths, she presumes), and shows what happens when a lover finds a woman’s “d-spot.” (She turns into a dinosaur.) In longer form, she has an animal-headed couple discussing the self-doubt of artists, and imagines celebrity chefs engaging in liquid-nitrogen fights. The subject matter in My Dirty Dumb Eyes ranges from the bizarre to the commonplace, and Hanawalt’s art can be both jaw-droppingly beautiful and purposefully hideous. She’s the opposite of Gauld and Martin in some ways, expressive where they’re minimalist. But what matters most is that she’s very, very funny, making what in other hands would be shock-comedy come off more like a friend describing a crazy dream. [NM]
 
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  Lisa Hanawalt on T.I.P.S! 159

Updated April 11, 2013


9 April 2013

Cartoonist and podcaster Lisa Hanawalt creeps into Panther’s Lair to check out some of our brand new show segments. There’s Alex Reads the News, and Mike Introduces Friends At A Party. Plus: A fascinating Wiki of The Week!
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Robot 6's advance review of My Dirty Dumb Eyes

Updated April 11, 2013


"Look into Lisa Hanawalt’s ‘Dirty Dumb Eyes’"

J. Caleb Mozzocco
Comic Book Resources, 4 April 2013

It seems like only last year that artist Lisa Hanawalt’s illustrated reviews/reactions to movies like War Horse and The Vow at online magazine The Hairpin were making me laugh and grab the closest person to the computer to cajole with “Dude, you have to read this!”

And now Drawn and Quarterly has released a beautifully designed collection of some 120 pages of Hanawalt’s work, including those illustrated humor pieces, comics and straight-up “fine art” artwork.

What’s that? It was only last year? Wow. D+Q sure didn’t waste any time on putting a Hanawalt collection together, but anything that brings the artist to the attention of more readers is fine with me — it will cut down on my cajoling friends, family and co-workers.

My Dirty Dumb Eyes assembles a great deal of Hanawalt’s previously published work from all over, meaning you can find much of it online for free, but the book format doesn’t bombard you with a low dose of electrical radiation, and is therefore much safer to read.


Herein you will find Hanawalt’s movie reviews — Drive, Rise of The Planet of the Apes, the aforementioned Vow and War Horse — which consist of her reactions and observations and copious illustrations in her particular style, which is just representational enough to be perfect for parody. For example, when she observes that Channing Tatum resembles a Labrador so much that “he looks like you couldn’t leave him in a room with the food left out,” and accompanies it with an image of actor guiltily curled up on the floor in his underwear, with chewed-up chocolate and phone bills all around, well, it looks like Channing Tatum.



The same format is employed in Hanawalt’s 14-page report on a toy fair in Manhattan.

Other pieces are much more image-heavy, with one illustration per phrase or item on a list (“What Do Dogs Want??”, “Rumors I’ve Heard About Anna Wintour,” “The Secret Lives of Chefs,” etc).



Perhaps the most surprising pieces are Hanawalt’s pure comics — you know, with panels and dialogue bubbles and everything.

There are a handful of these included, and they are striking for their somewhat-surreal quality. The characters are usually anthropomorphic animals drawn in an incredibly realistic style, generally looking mostly human from the neck down but bearing the heads of moose or horses or dogs. The situations can be strange, as in the bizarre, bird-centric goings on seen in “Extra Egg Room.”



But they are more striking still for the quality of the design and draftsmanship on display. Hanawalt is a fine artist, but on these strips she becomes an even finer one, with a greater attention to detail than is on display in the shorter, humor/article pieces. They’re like the work of an entirely different artist, to be honest.

Bridging the gap between the two are pages of Hanawalt’s art, which isn’t in service of a story or a gag or a series of jokes but just nice paintings of the things shes interested in: animal people in construction outfits, penises, scantily clad lizard-women lounging on a car, that sort of thing.

The result is something of a collection as portfolio, My Dirty Dumb Eyes showing the breadth of Hanawalt’s range of styles, formats and sense of humor. Dude, you have to read this — I don’t want to have to cajole you again.

*************************

Lisa Hanawalt’s My Dirty Dumb Eyes will be available in May.
 
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  Washington Post congratulates Lisa Hanawalt's "true talent"

Updated April 4, 2013


"JAMES BEARD HONOR: Gifted Lisa Hanawalt is ‘super-surprised’ by nod for illustrated ‘Chefs’ work"

Michael Cavna
The Washington Post, 18 March 2013

The James Beard Foundation announced the final nominees Monday for its 2013 Book, Broadcast and Journalism awards (as well as its Chef and Restaurant finalists). The Brooklyn-based Hanawalt is nominated in the Humor category for the “Chefs” piece she created for Lucky Peach, who features

“I was super-surprised — I never realized that the Beard Awards had a category for ‘Journalism/Humor,’ and I’m just thrilled to be nominated alongside some of the chefs I illustrated,” Hanawalt, an Ignatz Award winner who will appear at this year’s Small Press Expo, tells Comic Riffs.

“Now I’m trying to figure out how to get a Tony award via comics. ... ”

One chef she illustrated, David Chang of New York’s Momofuku Noodle Bar, is nominated for Outstanding Chef; and another, April Bloomfield of the Spotted Pig, is nominated for Best Chef NYC.

The media winners will be announced May 3; the chef/restaurant winners will be announced three days later.

(Also nominated: Washington Post contributor and chef/consultant Aliza Green, for her article “The gloves can come off, as far as I’m concerned.”)

Yet again, when it comes to illustrated journalism, true talent rises like a souffle.
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Lisa Hanawalt featured on It's Nice That

Updated April 4, 2013


"Delightful, dirty, anthropomorphic fun from the very skilled hand of Lisa Hanawalt"

Anna Trench
It's Nice That, Thursday 14 February 2013

A lot happens in cartoonist Lisa Hanawalt’s mouths. Sporting sexy high fashion, lizards drape themselves over fast cars with suggestive, slithering tongues. On construction sites, busty canine workers let their floppy tongues hang out as they fumble with hoses and cavort on excavators. In the forest, pink hounds happily leap out of a huge Darth Vader/puppy’s verdant, gaping jaws. Meanwhile, Obama swallows love-struck, tongue-entwined Romney and Ryan whole.

Brooklyn-based Hanawalt’s comics and illustrations have been gracing McSweeney’s, The Believer, The New York Times and other quality magazines for ages now. They’re bright, bizarre and often crammed with textile-clad animals partaking in suggestive anthropomorphic activities. They’re also, of course, very well drawn and designed. If you haven’t feasted upon them yet, get stuck in; if you have, feast again.
 
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  Lisa Hanaway's Hilarious International Beauty Show Video

Updated April 3, 2013


"Watch This LOL-Filled Vid of Lisa Hanawalt at the International Beauty Show"

Tess Duncan
BUST Magazine, 1 February 2013

Illustrator, cartoonist, and artist Lisa Hanawalt attended NYC’s International Beauty Show with her stand-up comedian boyfriend, Adam Conover. Hanawalt lets us know that she’s there to find out “how to be a real woman.” The two give their amusing takes on the whole ordeal, as Adam especially points out the ridiculousness of it all. (I have to admit, Adam, when I heard the acronym “IBS” my first thought was also Irritable Bowel Syndrome.)

Lisa Hanawalt has been featured in The NY Times, NY Times Magazine, Bloomberg Businessweek, Saveur, Lucky Peach Magazine, Vanity Fair, Glamour, The Tornante Company, Chronicle Books, Poketo, Vice Magazine, McSweeney’s, The Believer, Motion Theory, Teefury. She has also received many awards for her outstanding illustrations. AND most importantly, she has a book coming out this May on Drawn & Quarterly. The book, My Dirty Dumb Eyes, is a collection of hilarious comics from the Hairpin, NY Times Believer and more.
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D+Q at TCAF: Rutu Modan, Gilbert Hernandez, and Lisa Hanawalt!

Updated March 4, 2013


TCAF 2013 welcomes LISA HANAWALT, GILBERT HERNANDEZ, and RUTU MODAN
Drawn & Quarterly announces festival line-up and participating authors!

FEBRUARY 26—Today, The Toronto Comic Arts Festival 2013 teams with venerable Canadian publisher Drawn & Quarterly to welcome Lisa Hanawalt, Gilbert Hernandez, and Rutu Modan as Featured Guests of the festival. All three creators will attend TCAF 2013 in support of new works published by Drawn & Quarterly, and will be prominently featured in Festival programming taking place May 11-12 at Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge Street.

This trio of talented graphic novelists will join previously announced and mainstay Drawn & Quarterly cartoonists Marc Bell, Chester Brown, Seth, and Art Spiegelman as a part of the 2013 Festival, and a host of other cartoonists published by D&Q across their long history. Drawn & Quarterly’s exceptionally strong line-up will make appearances at the Drawn & Quarterly booth during TCAF’s main exhibition dates. They will also participate in various other programs, including displays of original art, panel discussions, interviews, and much more. Final programming details and schedules will be announced closer to the TCAF dates.

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Biographies:

Lisa Hanawalt is a renowned self-publisher and illustrator living in Brooklyn, New York. Her comics work has won several Ignatz awards, and the Stumptown Award for Best Small Press Publication in 2011. Hanawalt’s illustration and comics clients include The New York Times, New York Magazine, The Hairpin, McSweeneys, Chronicle Books and Vanity Fair. She will debut her first major comics work, My Dirty Dumb Eyes, at TCAF 2013.

Gilbert Hernandez has been called “One of the greatest American storytellers,” by Junot Diaz. Alongside his brothers Jaime and Mario, Gilbert co-created and contributed to the acclaimed comic book series Love and Rockets, which celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2012. Gilbert has won numerous awards for his stories, including the Kirby Award, Inkpot Award, Harvey Award, and the 2009 United States Artists Literature Fellowship. Gilbert will be at TCAF 2013 to debut his semiautobiographical new work Marble Season, easily one of the most-anticipated and most-important books of 2013.

Rutu Modan is the author of the phenomenal graphic novel Exit Wounds, which received enormous critical acclaim and was cited as one of the best graphic novels in its year of release by Entertainment Weekly, Time, The Washington Post, Publisher’s Weekly, and New York Magazine amongst others. An accomplished illustrator, graphic novelist, and teacher of the medium, her work is highly regarded around the world. Rutu Modan will attend TCAF 2013 to debut her new graphic novel The Property, published by Drawn & Quarterly. TCAF would like to thank the Consulate General of Israel in Toronto for their support of this trip.
 
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Featured artists

Rutu Modan
Gilbert Hernandez
Lisa Hanawalt

           Featured products

Marble Season
The Property
My Dirty Dumb Eyes




  D+Q to Publish Lisa Hanawalt

Updated June 20, 2012


Drawn & Quarterly has acquired world rights to MY DIRTY DUMB EYES by award-winning cartoonist Lisa Hanawalt, it was announced today by Tom Devlin, Acquiring Editor & Creative Director. To be released in Spring 2013, MY DIRTY DUMB EYES is Hanawalt’s first full length work. It will be a collection of her intricately detailed, absurdly funny comics that have appeared in The Hairpin, VanityFair.com, Lucky Peach, Saveur, The New York Times and The Believer.

"We have been fans of Lisa for a very long time, she is the great combination of excellent drawing ability and being genuinely laugh out loud funny,” said Devlin. “Her unhinged musings on pop culture and celebrity make her the premiere humorist for her generation. She approaches her subjects with both a stalker's wild-eyed mania and a satirist's precise control.”

MY DIRTY DUMB EYES will be distributed in the U.S. by Farrar, Straus & Giroux and in Canada by Raincoast Books. International rights are represented by Samantha Haywood of the Transatlantic Literary Agency. Meredith Kaffel of DeFiore and Company represented Hanawalt in negotiations.


Featured artist

Lisa Hanawalt

          




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