Atlantic calls BURMA CHRONICLES "a masterpiece of graphic nonfiction"

“Comic Books as Journalism: 10 Masterpieces of Graphic Nonfiction” / The Atlantic / Kirstin Butler / August 10, 2011

Who doesn't love comic books? While infographics may be trendy today (and photography perennially sexy), there's just something special about the work of the human hand. Good old-fashioned manual labor, literally, brings a unique richness to storytelling where words alone sometimes fall flat. I've put together a list of some of my favorite graphic non-fiction. These hybrid works combine the best elements of art, journalism, and scholarship, and provide the perfect way to mix some visual magic into your summer reading list.

9. BURMA CHRONICLES

The lovely Burma Chronicles is another fortuitous creative byproduct of Doctors Without Borders. Comic book artist Guy Delisle travels around the world with his wife, Nadège, an MSF doctor, tours which previously resulted in two other gorgeous works of graphic nonfiction -- Shenzen: A Travelogue from China, and Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea. Delisle lives the atypical life of an NGO house husband-cum-cartoonist, alternating between inking panels and daily perambulations near Nobel Prize winner's Aung Sang Suu Kyi's home, where the opposition figure was still under house arrest at the time he was in the country.

What makes Burma Chronicles so charming is its balance of quotidian domestic life and international affairs. Delisle's growing knowledge of the country's culture plays off the constant development of his infant son, lending the whole work (and the world) refreshing perspective.

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